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Title: Understanding the Complexities of Subnational Incentives in Supporting a National Market for Distributed Photovoltaics

Abstract

Subnational policies pertaining to photovoltaic (PV) systems have increased in volume in recent years and federal incentives are set to be phased out over the next few. Understanding how subnational policies function within and across jurisdictions, thereby impacting PV market development, informs policy decision making. This report was developed for subnational policy-makers and researchers in order to aid the analysis on the function of PV system incentives within the emerging PV deployment market. The analysis presented is based on a 'logic engine,' a database tool using existing state, utility, and local incentives allowing users to see the interrelationships between PV system incentives and parameters, such as geographic location, technology specifications, and financial factors. Depending on how it is queried, the database can yield insights into which combinations of incentives are available and most advantageous to the PV system owner or developer under particular circumstances. This is useful both for individual system developers to identify the most advantageous incentive packages that they qualify for as well as for researchers and policymakers to better understand the patch work of incentives nationwide as well as how they drive the market.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1159362
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-7A40-62238
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; INCENTIVE; PV; PHOTOVOLTAIC; DEPLOYMENT; LOGIC ENGINE; Energy Analysis; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Bush, B., Doris, E., and Getman, D. Understanding the Complexities of Subnational Incentives in Supporting a National Market for Distributed Photovoltaics. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1159362.
Bush, B., Doris, E., & Getman, D. Understanding the Complexities of Subnational Incentives in Supporting a National Market for Distributed Photovoltaics. United States. doi:10.2172/1159362.
Bush, B., Doris, E., and Getman, D. Mon . "Understanding the Complexities of Subnational Incentives in Supporting a National Market for Distributed Photovoltaics". United States. doi:10.2172/1159362. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1159362.
@article{osti_1159362,
title = {Understanding the Complexities of Subnational Incentives in Supporting a National Market for Distributed Photovoltaics},
author = {Bush, B. and Doris, E. and Getman, D.},
abstractNote = {Subnational policies pertaining to photovoltaic (PV) systems have increased in volume in recent years and federal incentives are set to be phased out over the next few. Understanding how subnational policies function within and across jurisdictions, thereby impacting PV market development, informs policy decision making. This report was developed for subnational policy-makers and researchers in order to aid the analysis on the function of PV system incentives within the emerging PV deployment market. The analysis presented is based on a 'logic engine,' a database tool using existing state, utility, and local incentives allowing users to see the interrelationships between PV system incentives and parameters, such as geographic location, technology specifications, and financial factors. Depending on how it is queried, the database can yield insights into which combinations of incentives are available and most advantageous to the PV system owner or developer under particular circumstances. This is useful both for individual system developers to identify the most advantageous incentive packages that they qualify for as well as for researchers and policymakers to better understand the patch work of incentives nationwide as well as how they drive the market.},
doi = {10.2172/1159362},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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