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Title: NYSERDA-DOE Final Report

Abstract

The portion of the $40 million Better Buildings award directly administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) is fully integrated with Green Jobs-Green New York (GJGNY). NYSERDA has committed most of the Better Buildings funding that it is administering to a Loan Loss Reserve (LLR) for a Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) that is capitalized by GJGNY. In addition, the City of New York, which has received a sub-award through NYSERDA in the amount of $21.4 million, received NYSERDA approval on their Strategy Memo outlining NYC’s financing plan for implementation. Based upon NYSERDA’s approval of the Strategy Memo, approximately $17.8 million in ARRA funds were released to fund NYC’s Loan Loss Reserve and Revolving Loan Fund.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Phillip McKissick/New West Technologies, LLC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)
OSTI Identifier:
1159171
Report Number(s):
NYSERDA DOE Final Report
DOE Contract Number:
EE0003558
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ahearn, John, and Gilbert, Erik. NYSERDA-DOE Final Report. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1159171.
Ahearn, John, & Gilbert, Erik. NYSERDA-DOE Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1159171.
Ahearn, John, and Gilbert, Erik. Mon . "NYSERDA-DOE Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1159171. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1159171.
@article{osti_1159171,
title = {NYSERDA-DOE Final Report},
author = {Ahearn, John and Gilbert, Erik},
abstractNote = {The portion of the $40 million Better Buildings award directly administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) is fully integrated with Green Jobs-Green New York (GJGNY). NYSERDA has committed most of the Better Buildings funding that it is administering to a Loan Loss Reserve (LLR) for a Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) that is capitalized by GJGNY. In addition, the City of New York, which has received a sub-award through NYSERDA in the amount of $21.4 million, received NYSERDA approval on their Strategy Memo outlining NYC’s financing plan for implementation. Based upon NYSERDA’s approval of the Strategy Memo, approximately $17.8 million in ARRA funds were released to fund NYC’s Loan Loss Reserve and Revolving Loan Fund.},
doi = {10.2172/1159171},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 06 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Oct 06 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This summer was the second year of operation for the New York Independent System Operator's (NYISO) suite of Price Responsive Load (PRL) Programs: the Day-Ahead Demand Response Program (DADRP), the Emergency Demand Response Program (EDRP), and the third year of operation for the Installed Capacity Program/Special Case Resources (ICAP/SCR) program. It also marked the second year that the New York State Energy Research Authority (NYSERDA) provided funding to support participation in these programs. NYISO and NYSERDA commissioned Neenan Associates to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of these PRL programs, building on methods and protocols developed last year andmore » augmented by significant professional staff resources provided by the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) with the U. S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) funding. The PRL program evaluation was undertaken from three perspectives. The first, top-down, perspective looks at the overall impact of PRL programs on New York electricity market prices and system reliability. Quantifying price impacts involves simulating what prices would have been had the curtailments not been undertaken. A supply model developed last year was used to reconstruct this year's market supply curve and estimate the change in hourly prices due to PRL-indiced curtailments. Reliability impacts were estimated by valuing the improvement in the reliability associated with curtailments undertaken through the EDRP and ICAP/SCR programs, which were jointly administered during 2002.« less
  • Microtron-based Compact, Portable Gamma-Ray Source. The objective of Phase I of this project was to produce a conceptual design of a prototype compact microtron electron accelerator, which could be designed, built, and demonstrated in Phase II of the project. The conceptual design study included an analysis of the parameters of the microtron and its components, and the expected performance of the prototype microtron as a source of x-rays and/or RF neutrons in the MeV energy range. The major components of the microtron are the magnet, the accelerating system, the power system, the vacuum system, the control system, the beam extractionmore » system and the targets to produce x-rays (and/or neutrons). Our objectives for the design of the prototype were for it to be compact, cost-effective, capable of producing high intensity x-ray (an/or neutron) fluxes. In addition, the prototype was to be easily assembled and disassembled so that components could be easily replaced. The main parameters for the prototype are the following: the range of electron kinetic energies, the output power, the RF frequency band (X-band, C-band, or S-Band), the type of injection (Type I or Type II), the magnet type, i.e. permanent magnet, electromagnet, or a hybrid combination of permanent and electromagnet. The results of the Phase I study and analysis for a prototype microtron are the following: The electron energy range can be varied from below 6 MeV to 9 MeV, the optimal frequency range is S-Band (2-4 GHz) RF frequency, Type II injection (described below), and the magnet type is the hybrid version. The prototype version will be capable of producing gamma ray doses of ~1800 R/min-m and neutron fluxes of up to ~6 x 10 10 n/s with appropriate targets. The results of the Phase I study and analysis are provided below. The proposed Phase II plan was to demonstrate the prototype at low beam power. In the subsequent Phase III, high power tests would be performed, and the design of commercial versions of microtrons with various energies, sizes and types would be produced and marketed, including a more compact and more portable 6 MeV battery-powered model that more closely meets the requirements in the original FOA topic description. In the course of the Phase I study, we also identified another microtron version, one that was larger (not compact) and more powerful than that of the Phase II prototype, which could serve as an intense source of photo- neutrons, up to 4 x 10 12 n/s for use in nuclear medicine, short-lived isotope production, or other applications. In addition, it could produce gamma dose rates up to 130 kR/min-m with a heavy metal bremsstrahlung target. The results and specifications of this were submitted to IPAC16 (Reference [12]) the paper is included in Addendum B. Because this version was beyond the scope of the Phase I project, there is no additional description in the Final Report.« less
  • The major emphasis of this effort was the planning and establishment of an active network for acquiring and processing energy/labor data into information for dissemination within DOE and to the energy/labor market of DOE Region IV. The network is designed to provide DOE with a feedback system, encourage labor participation in DOE policy development, and allow the assessment of labor response. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II, DOE Region IV Energy/Labor Communications Network, explains what was accomplished (the energy/labor communications network was developed and put into operation) and the mechanisms involved. Chapter III, Articulation of Energy/Labor Issues, identifies many ofmore » the network elements and participants involved in the Power plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Impact Assessment, the Florida Energy/Labor Forum, and interview sessions. Functions, procedures and responsibilities are discussed and good insight can be gained regarding the results and value of such programs. Chapter IV, Network Development, explains how Vachon, Nix and Associates (VNA) accomplished the development and operation of the energy/labor communications network. This chapter explains VNA's use of the Systematic-Approach in the Development of Institutional Relations with the Labor Community. Chapter V, Conclusions, presents several different conclusions of an on-going effort for the network operation. (MCW)« less
  • The project area is located on the Hood River, near river-mile 11 (Township 2 North, Range 9 East, Section 29). The Hood River flows south to north, adjacent to the project area with Joe's Creek entering on the east bank. Joe's Creek is an intermittent stream approximately 1,000 feet long on a high alluvial terrace at the base of a talus slope. Farmers Irrigation District (FID) proposes modifying the intake and flume of the irrigation district's canal in order to reduce sediment that enters the canal. The modification consists of redistributing boulders and stream bottom material to shift the existingmore » thalweg of Hood River toward the west, away from the intake, and installing two sediment excluder sills in the upper portion of the canal. The FID also proposes installing a new transmission water line, which will replace an existing trestle and flume that presently links the irrigation district intake to a canal system that transports water into the low croplands of the Hood River Valley. In addition to the new transmission water line, a new fish screen would be constructed which necessitates a fish bypass that returns fish back to the Hood River. The existing fish screen is an older obsolete concept and the existing fish bypass consists of a small diameter flexible culvert. FID proposes a bypass system that not only returns fish to the Hood River but also increases fisheries habitat availability in the watershed. To accomplish this, a new channel would be created between the existing irrigation canal and Joe's Creek. The area of proposed new channel construction is entirely upland. Proposed alterations in Joe's Creek consist of rearing pool creation, the installation of two culverts (one under an existing road and one near the outlet to Hood River), creation of a plunge pool at the outlet of the upper culvert and a series of jump pools extending 50 feet east of the confluence with the Hood River. The existing channel would be recontoured to handle bypass flows and enhanced to provide fisheries habitat. The existing fish screen would be replaced with a new fish screen that would be constructed in a new concrete flume along the existing pipeline alignment. The new fish screen would be a horizontally oriented, 160-foot long flat plate screen, a relatively new type of screen called a Horizontal Flat Plate (HFP). The screen would be 10 feet wide at the entrance. Both of the screen sidewalls would taper evenly for 140 feet to an outlet transition throat which would typically be set to 24 inches wide. The transition throat would be of equal width throughout its 20-foot length. One of the screen sidewalls would be adjustable in order to allow for fine-tuning of the screen hydraulics and the outlet transition throat width. Water passing through the outlet transition throat would flow with a short plunge of approximately 0.7 feet to the headwater pool at the beginning of Joe's Creek, which is the fish return bypass system.« less
  • This report covers activities in the Univesity of Illinois Department of Nulcear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering Matching Grant Program for the period form 30 September 1995 to 30 March 2003. The funds for this program include industrial partner funds which were matched, or nearly matched by DOE-NE. The industrial partner was Commonwealth Edison, which changed its corporate structure and name to Exelon during the course of the contract. The funds from the contract were used to support nuclear engineering educational needs, including undergraduate and graduate students support, purchase of laboratory equipment, support for seminar speakers and conferences, and support formore » new faculty members. The funds were instrumental in maintaining a first quality nuclear engineering educational program at the University of Illinois.« less