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Title: Laser Heating and Penetration of Aluminum Alloys at 0.8-micron Wavelength

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1158892
Report Number(s):
LLNL-CONF-659418
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: Directed Energy Systems Symposium 2014, Monterey, CA, United States, Aug 25 - Aug 28, 2014
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUMM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Wu, S, Florando, J, Khairallah, S, LeBlanc, M, Lowdermilk, H, McCallen, R, Rubenchik, A, and Stanley, J. Laser Heating and Penetration of Aluminum Alloys at 0.8-micron Wavelength. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Wu, S, Florando, J, Khairallah, S, LeBlanc, M, Lowdermilk, H, McCallen, R, Rubenchik, A, & Stanley, J. Laser Heating and Penetration of Aluminum Alloys at 0.8-micron Wavelength. United States.
Wu, S, Florando, J, Khairallah, S, LeBlanc, M, Lowdermilk, H, McCallen, R, Rubenchik, A, and Stanley, J. Tue . "Laser Heating and Penetration of Aluminum Alloys at 0.8-micron Wavelength". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1158892.
@article{osti_1158892,
title = {Laser Heating and Penetration of Aluminum Alloys at 0.8-micron Wavelength},
author = {Wu, S and Florando, J and Khairallah, S and LeBlanc, M and Lowdermilk, H and McCallen, R and Rubenchik, A and Stanley, J},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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