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Title: Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

Abstract

To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1158859
Report Number(s):
PNNL-ACT-10015
DOE Contract Number:
DEAC0576RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hu, Jian Zhi. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1158859.
Hu, Jian Zhi. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1. United States. doi:10.2172/1158859.
Hu, Jian Zhi. Tue . "Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1". United States. doi:10.2172/1158859. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1158859.
@article{osti_1158859,
title = {Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1},
author = {Hu, Jian Zhi},
abstractNote = {To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.},
doi = {10.2172/1158859},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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