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Title: Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind

Abstract

Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind Power Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1158448
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5D00-61825
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; TRANSMISSION; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; DISTRIBUTED WIND POWER; VOLTAGE; NREL; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Allen, A. Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1158448.
Allen, A. Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind. United States. doi:10.2172/1158448.
Allen, A. Mon . "Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind". United States. doi:10.2172/1158448. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1158448.
@article{osti_1158448,
title = {Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind},
author = {Allen, A.},
abstractNote = {Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.},
doi = {10.2172/1158448},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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