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Title: Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, United States
  2. Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Richardson, Texas 75080, United States
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1158414
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-08ER46528
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 18; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-24 11:18:00; Journal ID: ISSN 1944-8244
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Englade-Franklin, Lauren E., Morrison, Gregory, Verberne-Sutton, Susan D., Francis, Asenath L., Chan, Julia Y., and Garno, Jayne C. Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1021/am503571z.
Englade-Franklin, Lauren E., Morrison, Gregory, Verberne-Sutton, Susan D., Francis, Asenath L., Chan, Julia Y., & Garno, Jayne C. Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers. United States. doi:10.1021/am503571z.
Englade-Franklin, Lauren E., Morrison, Gregory, Verberne-Sutton, Susan D., Francis, Asenath L., Chan, Julia Y., and Garno, Jayne C. Tue . "Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers". United States. doi:10.1021/am503571z.
@article{osti_1158414,
title = {Surface-Directed Synthesis of Erbium-Doped Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles within Organosilane Zeptoliter Containers},
author = {Englade-Franklin, Lauren E. and Morrison, Gregory and Verberne-Sutton, Susan D. and Francis, Asenath L. and Chan, Julia Y. and Garno, Jayne C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/am503571z},
journal = {ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces},
number = 18,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/am503571z

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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