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Title: Application of Interdependency Models to Infrastructure Risk Assessment.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1157531
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-1830C
523632
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Risk Symposium 2007, Risk Analysis for Homeland Security and Defense held March 26-28, 2007 in Santa Fe, NM.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Pless, Daniel J., DeLand, Sharon Marie, Wilson, Michael L., Ames, Arlo L., Powell, Dennis R., Izraelevitz, David, and Samsa, Michael. Application of Interdependency Models to Infrastructure Risk Assessment.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Pless, Daniel J., DeLand, Sharon Marie, Wilson, Michael L., Ames, Arlo L., Powell, Dennis R., Izraelevitz, David, & Samsa, Michael. Application of Interdependency Models to Infrastructure Risk Assessment.. United States.
Pless, Daniel J., DeLand, Sharon Marie, Wilson, Michael L., Ames, Arlo L., Powell, Dennis R., Izraelevitz, David, and Samsa, Michael. Thu . "Application of Interdependency Models to Infrastructure Risk Assessment.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1157531.
@article{osti_1157531,
title = {Application of Interdependency Models to Infrastructure Risk Assessment.},
author = {Pless, Daniel J. and DeLand, Sharon Marie and Wilson, Michael L. and Ames, Arlo L. and Powell, Dennis R. and Izraelevitz, David and Samsa, Michael},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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