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Title: Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components

Abstract

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with nondestructive examination (NDE) of coarse-grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components for over 30 years. More recent work has focused on mapping the ultrasonic sound fields generated by low-frequency phased array probes that are typically used for the evaluation of CASS materials for flaw detection and characterization. The casting process results in the formation of large grained material microstructures that are nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. The propagation of ultrasonic energy for examination of these materials results in scattering, partitioning and redirection of these sound fields. The work reported here provides an assessment of sound field formation in these materials and provides recommendations on ultrasonic inspection parameters for flaw detection in CASS components.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1156992
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-100834
401001060
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: PVP 2014: 2014 Pressure Vessels & Piping Conference: Innovation and Imagination in Pressure Vessels and Piping, July 20-24, 2014, Anaheim, California, Paper No. PVP2014-28832
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Ultrasonic, Phased Array, Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS), Sound Field Mapping, Flaw Detection

Citation Formats

Crawford, Susan L., Prowant, Matthew S., Cinson, Anthony D., Larche, Michael R., and Diaz, Aaron A. Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Crawford, Susan L., Prowant, Matthew S., Cinson, Anthony D., Larche, Michael R., & Diaz, Aaron A. Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components. United States.
Crawford, Susan L., Prowant, Matthew S., Cinson, Anthony D., Larche, Michael R., and Diaz, Aaron A. Fri . "Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1156992,
title = {Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components},
author = {Crawford, Susan L. and Prowant, Matthew S. and Cinson, Anthony D. and Larche, Michael R. and Diaz, Aaron A.},
abstractNote = {The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with nondestructive examination (NDE) of coarse-grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components for over 30 years. More recent work has focused on mapping the ultrasonic sound fields generated by low-frequency phased array probes that are typically used for the evaluation of CASS materials for flaw detection and characterization. The casting process results in the formation of large grained material microstructures that are nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. The propagation of ultrasonic energy for examination of these materials results in scattering, partitioning and redirection of these sound fields. The work reported here provides an assessment of sound field formation in these materials and provides recommendations on ultrasonic inspection parameters for flaw detection in CASS components.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to assist in understanding the effects of coarse-grained microstructures found in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials on acoustic longitudinal wave propagation. Ultrasonic laboratory measurements were made on three specimens representing four different grain structures. Phased array (PA) probes were fixed on each specimen surface and excited in the longitudinal mode at specific angles while a point receiver was scanned in a raster pattern over the end of the specimen, generating a transmitted sound field image. Three probes operating at nominal frequencies of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 MHz were used. A 6.4more » mm (0.25-in.) thick slice was removed from the specimen end and beam mapping was repeated three times, yielding four full sets of beam images. Data were collected both with a constant part path for each configuration (probe, specimen and slice, angle, etc.) and with a variable part path (fixed position on the surface). The base specimens and slices were then polished and etched to reveal measureable grain microstructures that were compared to the sound field interactions and scattering effects seen in the collected data.« less
  • A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to further understand the effects of coarse grained microstructures found in CASS materials on phased array ultrasonic wave propagation. Laboratory measurements were made on three CASS specimens with different microstructures; the specimens were polished and etched to reveal measurable grain sizes, shapes and orientations. Three longitudinal, phased array probes were fixed on a specimen's outside diameter with the sound field directed toward one end (face) of the pipe segment over a fixed range of angles. A point receiver was raster scanned over the surface of the specimen face generating a sound fieldmore » image. A slice of CASS material was then removed from the specimen end and the beam mapping exercise repeated. The sound fields acquired were analyzed for spot size, coherency, and beam redirection. Analyses were conducted between the resulting sound fields and the microstructural characteristics of each specimen.« less
  • This study maps the phased array-generated acoustic sound fields through three types of CASS microstructure in four specimens to quantitatively assess the beam formation effectiveness in these materials.
  • Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor (LWR) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This particular study focused on the evaluation of custom-designed, low-frequency (500 kHz) phased-array (PA) probes for examining welds in thick-section cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping. In addition, research was conducted to observe ultrasonic soundmore » field propagation effects from known coarse-grained microstructures found in parent CASS material. The study was conducted on a variety of thick-wall, coarse-grained CASS specimens that were previously inspected by an older generation 500-kHz PA-UT probe and acquisition instrument configuration. This comparative study describes the impact of the new PA probe design on flaw detection and sizing in a low signal-to-noise environment. The set of Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) CASS specimens examined in this study are greater than 50.8-mm (2.0-in.) thick with documented flaws and microstructures. These specimens are on loan to PNNL from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The flaws contained within these specimens are thermal fatigue cracks (TFC) or mechanical fatigue cracks (MFC) and range from 13% to 42% in through-wall extent. In addition, ultrasonic signal continuity was evaluated on two CASS parent material ring sections by examining the edge-of-pipe response (corner geometry) for regions of signal loss.« less
  • A set of circumferentially oriented thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) were implanted into three cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) pressurizer (PZR) surge-line specimens (pipe-to-elbow welds) that were fabricated using vintage CASS materials formed in the 1970s, and flaw responses from these cracks were used to evaluate detection and sizing performance of the phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods applied. Four different custom-made PA probes were employed in this study, operating nominally at 800 kHz, 1.0 MHz, 1.5 MHz, and 2.0 MHz center frequencies. The CASS PZR surge-line specimens were polished and chemically etched to bring out the microstructures of both pipemore » and elbow segments. Additional studies were conducted and documented to address baseline CASS material noise and observe possible ultrasonic beam redirection phenomena.« less