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Title: Banking on Solar: New Opportunities for Lending (Fact Sheet)

Abstract

The U.S. solar industry is a $13.7 billion market with roughly 450,000 systems in place. Bank and credit union lending for solar system deployment represents a valuable new opportunity for lenders to expand their consumer and commercial customer relationships, bring on new relationships and open a new asset class category.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1155118
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-6A20-62016
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Relation:
Related Information: NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; SUNSHOT; FINANCE; FINANCING; SOFT COST; SOLAR; BOS; BALANCE OF SYSTEM; SAPC; SOLAR ACCESS TO PUBLIC CAPITAL

Citation Formats

Not Available. Banking on Solar: New Opportunities for Lending (Fact Sheet). United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Not Available. Banking on Solar: New Opportunities for Lending (Fact Sheet). United States.
Not Available. Fri . "Banking on Solar: New Opportunities for Lending (Fact Sheet)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1155118.
@article{osti_1155118,
title = {Banking on Solar: New Opportunities for Lending (Fact Sheet)},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The U.S. solar industry is a $13.7 billion market with roughly 450,000 systems in place. Bank and credit union lending for solar system deployment represents a valuable new opportunity for lenders to expand their consumer and commercial customer relationships, bring on new relationships and open a new asset class category.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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