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Title: Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

Abstract

A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SunPower Corporation, San Jose, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1154931
Patent Number(s):
8,822,262
Application Number:
13/335,550
Assignee:
SunPower Corporation (San Jose, CA) GFO
DOE Contract Number:
FC36-07GO17043
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY

Citation Formats

Loscutoff, Paul, Molesa, Steve, and Kim, Taeseok. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Loscutoff, Paul, Molesa, Steve, & Kim, Taeseok. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles. United States.
Loscutoff, Paul, Molesa, Steve, and Kim, Taeseok. Tue . "Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1154931.
@article{osti_1154931,
title = {Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles},
author = {Loscutoff, Paul and Molesa, Steve and Kim, Taeseok},
abstractNote = {A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Patent:

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  • An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.
  • An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.
  • In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contractmore » No. EY-76-C-03-1283.« less
  • In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40/sup 0/ and 70/sup 0/ and preferably between 55/sup 0/ and 65/sup 0/ when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40/sup 0/ and 70/sup 0/ when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. 10 claims.
  • A novel, simplified method for fabricating a thin-film semiconductor heterojunction photovoltaic device includes initial steps of depositing a layer of cadmium stannate and a layer of zinc stannate on a transparent substrate, both by radio frequency sputtering at ambient temperature, followed by the depositing of dissimilar layers of semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide and cadmium telluride, and heat treatment to convert the cadmium stannate to a substantially single-phase material of a spinel crystal structure. Preferably, the cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited by radio frequency sputtering at ambient temperature, and the cadmium telluride layer is deposited by close space sublimationmore » at an elevated temperature effective to convert the amorphous cadmium stannate to the polycrystalline cadmium stannate with single-phase spinel structure.« less