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Title: Microbial Community Analysis of Soils Contaminated with Lead, Chromium and Petroleum Hydrocarbons

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1154143
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Microbial Ecology; Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Janet,Joynt, Marianne,Bischoff, Ron,Turco, Allan,Konopka, and Cindy H.,Nakatsu. Microbial Community Analysis of Soils Contaminated with Lead, Chromium and Petroleum Hydrocarbons. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1007/s00248-005-0205-0.
Janet,Joynt, Marianne,Bischoff, Ron,Turco, Allan,Konopka, & Cindy H.,Nakatsu. Microbial Community Analysis of Soils Contaminated with Lead, Chromium and Petroleum Hydrocarbons. United States. doi:10.1007/s00248-005-0205-0.
Janet,Joynt, Marianne,Bischoff, Ron,Turco, Allan,Konopka, and Cindy H.,Nakatsu. Wed . "Microbial Community Analysis of Soils Contaminated with Lead, Chromium and Petroleum Hydrocarbons". United States. doi:10.1007/s00248-005-0205-0.
@article{osti_1154143,
title = {Microbial Community Analysis of Soils Contaminated with Lead, Chromium and Petroleum Hydrocarbons},
author = {Janet,Joynt and Marianne,Bischoff and Ron,Turco and Allan,Konopka and Cindy H.,Nakatsu},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/s00248-005-0205-0},
journal = {Microbial Ecology},
number = 2,
volume = 51,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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