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Title: Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

Abstract

In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement formore » both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
115413
Report Number(s):
ORNL-6874
ON: DE95015441; TRN: 95:006983-0015
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1994 through March 1995; PB: 203 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN FUEL; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; BIOTECHNOLOGY; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS; CARBON DIOXIDE; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; CHLAMYDOMONAS; BIOCONVERSION; PROGRESS REPORT

Citation Formats

Greenbaum, E., Lee, J. W., and Tevault, C. V. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/115413.
Greenbaum, E., Lee, J. W., & Tevault, C. V. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/115413
Greenbaum, E., Lee, J. W., and Tevault, C. V. Thu . "Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/115413. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/115413.
@article{osti_115413,
title = {Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing},
author = {Greenbaum, E. and Lee, J. W. and Tevault, C. V.},
abstractNote = {In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.},
doi = {10.2172/115413},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/115413}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {6}
}