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Title: Pathways of Carbon Assimilation and Ammonia Oxidation Suggested by Environmental Genomic Analyses of Marine Crenarchaeota

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Joint Genome Institute (JGI)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1154007
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: PLoS Biology; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Steven J.,Hallam, Tracy J.,Mincer, Christa,Schleper, Christina M.,Preston, Katie,Roberts, Paul M.,Richardson, and Edward F.,DeLong. Pathways of Carbon Assimilation and Ammonia Oxidation Suggested by Environmental Genomic Analyses of Marine Crenarchaeota. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0040095.
Steven J.,Hallam, Tracy J.,Mincer, Christa,Schleper, Christina M.,Preston, Katie,Roberts, Paul M.,Richardson, & Edward F.,DeLong. Pathways of Carbon Assimilation and Ammonia Oxidation Suggested by Environmental Genomic Analyses of Marine Crenarchaeota. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0040095.
Steven J.,Hallam, Tracy J.,Mincer, Christa,Schleper, Christina M.,Preston, Katie,Roberts, Paul M.,Richardson, and Edward F.,DeLong. Sun . "Pathways of Carbon Assimilation and Ammonia Oxidation Suggested by Environmental Genomic Analyses of Marine Crenarchaeota". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0040095.
@article{osti_1154007,
title = {Pathways of Carbon Assimilation and Ammonia Oxidation Suggested by Environmental Genomic Analyses of Marine Crenarchaeota},
author = {Steven J.,Hallam and Tracy J.,Mincer and Christa,Schleper and Christina M.,Preston and Katie,Roberts and Paul M.,Richardson and Edward F.,DeLong},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pbio.0040095},
journal = {PLoS Biology},
number = 4,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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