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Title: Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1152548
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Molecular&Cellular Proteomics; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

R.,Fang. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1074/mcp.M500301-MCP200.
R.,Fang. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach. United States. doi:10.1074/mcp.M500301-MCP200.
R.,Fang. Tue . "Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach". United States. doi:10.1074/mcp.M500301-MCP200.
@article{osti_1152548,
title = {Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach},
author = {R.,Fang},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1074/mcp.M500301-MCP200},
journal = {Molecular&Cellular Proteomics},
number = 4,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 06 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Dec 06 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly usingmore » statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.« less
  • Abstract The high-throughput accurate mass and time tag (AMT) proteomic approach was utilized to characterize the proteomes for cytoplasm, cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane fractions from aerobic and photosynthetic cultures of the gram-nagtive bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. In addition, we analyzed the proteins within purified chromatophore fractions that house the photosynthetic apparatus from photosynthetically grown cells. In total, 8300 peptides were identified with high confidence from at least one sub-cellular fraction from either cell culture. These peptides were derived from 1514 genes or 35% percent of proteins predicted to be encoded by the genome. A significant number of thesemore » proteins were detected within a single sub-cellular fraction and their localization was compared to in-silico predictions. However, the majority of proteins were observed in multiple sub-cellular fractions, and the most likely sub-cellular localization for these proteins was investigated using a Z-score analysis of peptide abundance along with clustering techniques. Good (81%) agreement was observed between the experimental results and in-silico predictions. The AMT tag approach provides localization evidence for those proteins that have no predicted localization information, those annotated as putative proteins, and/or for those proteins annotated as hypothetical and conserved hypothetical.« less
  • Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. We describe here an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide mass and time tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations and the database servesmore » as a ‘look-up’ table for peptide identification. The mass and time tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, which yielded 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied to the comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration without depletion of high abundant proteins. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated with both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 28 proteins were observed to be significantly changed following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response mediators.« less
  • Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression onmore » the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.« less
  • Proteome comparison of cell lines derived from breast cancer and normal breast epithelium provide opportunities to identify differentially expressed proteins and pathways associated with specific phenotypes. We employed trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O peptide labeling, FTI-CR mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy to calculate compare the relative protein abundances of hundreds of proteins simultaneously in non-cancer and cancer cell lines derived from breast tissue. A reference panel of cell lines was created to facilitate comparisons of relative protein abundance amongst multiple cell lines and across multiple experiments. A peptide database generated from multidimensional LC separations and MS/MS analysismore » was used to facilitate subsequent AMT tag-based peptide identifications. This peptide database represented a total of 2,299 proteins, including 514 that were quantified using the AMT tag and 16O/18O strategies. Eighty-six proteins showed at least a 3-fold protein abundance change between cancer and non-cancer cell lines. A comparison of protein expression profiles with previously published gene expression data revealed that 21 of these proteins also had >3-fold differences between the non-cancer and cancer cell lines at the transcriptional level. Clustering of protein abundance ratios revealed that several groups of proteins were differentially expressed between the cancer cell lines« less