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Title: "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices"

Abstract

This theoretical project has been carried out in close interaction with the experimental project at UW-Madison under the same title led by PI Max Lagally and co-PI Mark Eriksson. Extensive computational studies have been performed to address a broad range of topics from atomic structure, stability, mechanical property, to electronic structure, optoelectronic and transport properties of various nanoarchitectures in the context of Si and other solid nanomembranes. These have been done by using combinations of different theoretical and computational approaches, ranging from first-principles calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to finite-element (FE) analyses and continuum modeling.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
university of utah
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1150736
Report Number(s):
DOE-Utah-46027
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-03ER46027
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; nanomembrane, quantum dots, strain, first-principle computation

Citation Formats

liu, feng. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices". United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1150736.
liu, feng. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices". United States. doi:10.2172/1150736.
liu, feng. 2014. ""Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices"". United States. doi:10.2172/1150736. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1150736.
@article{osti_1150736,
title = {"Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices"},
author = {liu, feng},
abstractNote = {This theoretical project has been carried out in close interaction with the experimental project at UW-Madison under the same title led by PI Max Lagally and co-PI Mark Eriksson. Extensive computational studies have been performed to address a broad range of topics from atomic structure, stability, mechanical property, to electronic structure, optoelectronic and transport properties of various nanoarchitectures in the context of Si and other solid nanomembranes. These have been done by using combinations of different theoretical and computational approaches, ranging from first-principles calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to finite-element (FE) analyses and continuum modeling.},
doi = {10.2172/1150736},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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