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Title: Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science

Abstract

The original intent of this project was to build and operate an Advanced Network and Distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science that will prepare the Open Science Grid (OSG) community for a new generation of wide area communication capabilities operating at a 100Gb rate. Given the significant cut in our proposed budget we changed the scope of the ANDSL to focus on the software aspects of the laboratory – workload generators and monitoring tools and on the offering of experimental data to the ANI project. The main contributions of our work are twofold: early end-user input and experimental data to the ANI project and software tools for conducting large scale end-to-end data placement experiments.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Wisconsin - Madison
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
Contributing Org.:
Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison
OSTI Identifier:
1149707
Report Number(s):
Final reprot
DOE Contract Number:
SC0002298
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Advanced Network Initiative 100Gb networks Network testbed Open Science Grid

Citation Formats

Livny, Miron. Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1149707.
Livny, Miron. Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science. United States. doi:10.2172/1149707.
Livny, Miron. Sun . "Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science". United States. doi:10.2172/1149707. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1149707.
@article{osti_1149707,
title = {Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science},
author = {Livny, Miron},
abstractNote = {The original intent of this project was to build and operate an Advanced Network and Distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science that will prepare the Open Science Grid (OSG) community for a new generation of wide area communication capabilities operating at a 100Gb rate. Given the significant cut in our proposed budget we changed the scope of the ANDSL to focus on the software aspects of the laboratory – workload generators and monitoring tools and on the offering of experimental data to the ANI project. The main contributions of our work are twofold: early end-user input and experimental data to the ANI project and software tools for conducting large scale end-to-end data placement experiments.},
doi = {10.2172/1149707},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 17 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Aug 17 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Modern scientific computing involves organizing, moving, visualizing, and analyzing massive amounts of data at multiple sites around the world. The technologies, the middleware services, and the architectures that are used to build useful high-speed, wide area distributed systems, constitute the field of data intensive computing. In this paper the authors describe an architecture for data intensive applications where they use a high-speed distributed data cache as a common element for all of the sources and sinks of data. This cache-based approach provides standard interfaces to a large, application-oriented, distributed, on-line, transient storage system. They describe their implementation of this cache,more » how they have made it network aware, and how they do dynamic load balancing based on the current network conditions. They also show large increases in application throughput by access to knowledge of the network conditions.« less
  • This project seeks to understand the mechanism of elementary chemical reactions on solid surfaces, with implications for heterogeneous catalysis, atmospheric chemistry, and materials synthesis. The emphasis of the study is placed on an atomic scale understanding by probing the fundamental motions of individual molecules such as vibration, rotation, conformational change, and nuclear motions leading to bond dissociation and formation. The pathways of energy flow during a chemical transformation are investigated by considering the excitation source (photons, tunneling electrons, and heat or phonons), electronic and nuclear relaxation mechanisms and rates, and charge and energy transfers.
  • Improved models of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media are required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose-zone barriers to contaminant migrations. The development of these improved models requires field and laboratory results to evaluate their efficacy. However, controlled laboratory experiments simulating vadose conditions can require extensive period of time, and often are conducted at condition near saturation rather than the much drier conditions common in many contaminated arid vadose zone sites. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) andmore » the University of Idaho as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project focused on the development and evaluation of geocentrifuge techniques and equipment that allows vadose zone experiments to be conducted for relevant conditions in time frames not possible in conventional bench top experiments. A key and novel aspect of the research was the use of the 2-meter radius geocentrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory to conduct unsaturated transport experiments. Specifically, the following activities were conducted ** Reviewing of the theory of unsaturated flow in the geocentrifuge to establish the range of centrifuge accelerations/experimental conditions and the translation of centrifuge results to 1 gravity applications. ** Designing, constructing, and testing of in-flight experimental apparatus allowing the replication of traditional bench top unsaturated transport experiments on the geocentrifuge. ** Performing unsaturated 1-dimenstional column geocentrifuge experiments using conservative tracers to evaluate the effects of increased centrifugal acceleration on derived transport properties and assessing the scaling relationships for these properties. Because the application of geocentrifuge techniques to vadose transport is in its infancy experimental apparatus such as pumps, flow meters, columns, fraction collectors, etc. that would reliably function under the increased self weight experienced on the centrifuge had to be developed and tested as part of this project. Although, we initially planed to conduct experiments using reactive tracer and 2-dimensional heterogeneities, the cost and time associated with designing, building, and testing of experimental apparatus limited our experimental program to conservative tracer experiments using 1-dimensional columns. The results we obtained in this study indicate that the geocentrifuge technique is a viable experimental method for the study of subsurface processes where gravitational acceleration is important. The geocentrifuge allows experiments to be completed more quickly than tests conducted at 1-g, can be used to experimentally address important scaling issues, and permits experiments under a range of conditions that would be difficult or impossible using conventional approaches. The application of the geocentrifuge approaches and associated models developed in this project allows more meaningful investigation of DOE relevant vadose-zone issues under scalable conditions in time frames previously not obtainable.« less
  • Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy research and weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants represents a cost-effective treatment strategy that minimizes workers’ exposure to hazardous substances, does not require removal or transport of contaminants, and generally does not generate a secondary waste stream. We have investigated an in situ bioremediation approach that immobilizes radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadosemore » zones in the arid west, can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of a solid solution. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), University of Idaho, and University of Toronto as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project has focused on in situ microbially-catalyzed urea hydrolysis, which results in an increase in pH, carbonate alkalinity, ammonium, calcite precipitation, and co-precipitation of divalent cations. In calcite-saturated aquifers, microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. Key results of the project include: **Demonstrating the linkage between urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation in field and laboratory experiments **Observing strontium incorporation into calcite precipitate by urea hydrolyzers with higher distribution coefficient than in abiotic **Developing and applying molecular methods for characterizing microbial urease activity in groundwater including a quantitative PCR method for enumerating ureolytic bacteria **Applying the suite of developed molecular methods to assess the feasibility of the proposed bioremediation technique at a contaminated site located within the 100-N area of the Hanford, Washington site **Assessing the role of nitrification on the persistence of precipitated calcite by modifying primers for identification of the amoA gene region of various ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) for characterizing AOB in the field« less
  • The Southwest United States of America – Distributed Technology Training Consortia (SWUSA-DTTC) leveraged the highest concentration of renewable resources in the U.S. as well as operation of the leading independent microgrid installations and other distributed technologies to collect and analyze real-time data streams, advance power system simulations and analysis, identify educational and training gaps and develop solutions-focused curricula. The SWUSA-DTTC consortium posed a unique collaboration between universities and utilities to ensure that classes were focused on subjects and topics of interest to the utilities and ones that had practical benefit related to the preparedness for accommodating high penetration of solarmore » and other distributed energy technologies. This approach to have a close collaboration and shared effort to develop the course content and curriculum is unique and a significant departure from conventional course development. This coursework and training was intended to endure over a long time horizon (10-20 year time frame), and include professionals over the entire Southwest region and the rest of the US, and even outreach into foreign countries. Project Objectives In order to support the increase in power systems research, development, and analytical capacity, the SWUSA-DTTC brought together respected professors in Power Systems education, student/professor research and development, and valuable industry and utility experience. Through this program, the partnered universities created and/or modified existing curricula available to students and professionals in the form of university courses, short courses, videos, consortia-led training, and online materials. During this time, the supporting vendors and utilities provided the SWUSA-DTTC with technical advisory roles as well as providing input and feedback in terms of utility and related energy industry needs. The goals were to create power and energy systems training, curricula, and workforce preparedness through the inclusion of data collection and analysis, power systems expertise, and application-specific training activities which build on fundamental principles, modeling and simulation tools, field-immersed training and methods of performance validation. The outcome of the program was to result in better prepared and greater number of graduates ready to contribute to the field of power systems which depend upon the safe, reliable and efficient generation sources which make up an increasingly diverse mix of renewable power. Additionally, the program was to deliver critical training modules which are intended to support mid-career professionals and be woven into utility training programs used all over the country. Discontinuation Summary On September 29, 2014, Electricore received notice of discontinuation of federal funding under subject Award DE-EE0006339. DOE’s notice of discontinuation was the first indication provided to Electricore that the work completed against Task 1 - Program Planning and Evaluation during Budget Period 1 was inadequate. Significantly, the discontinuation was based in large part on the erroneous assertion that many of the tasks were incomplete as indicated in the Continuation Application. However, the Continuation Application was submitted July 29, 2014, while the period of performance for this last quarter in Budget Period 1 did not end until September 30, 2014. Accordingly, the performance for this last quarter in Budget Period 1 will be reported in the upcoming Quarterly Report which is not due until October 30, 2014. Nevertheless, in response to DOE’s letter and in further support of Electricore’s Continuation Application, we are providing a detailed status demonstrating adherence to all program requirements for each Task 1, Budget Period 1 SOPO activity and milestones in response to the DOE review.« less