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Title: Volatility-Resolved Measurements of Total Gas-Phase Organic Compounds by High-Resolution Electron Impact Mass Spectrometry

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Principal Investigator
  2. Co-PI/Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  3. Co-PI/University of Colorado, Boulder
  4. Co-PI/Washington University at St. Louis
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Aerodyne Research, Inc.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Contributing Org.:
Aerodyne Research, Inc. Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Colorado at Boulder Washington University at St. Louis
OSTI Identifier:
1148720
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC0001666
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001666
Type / Phase:
SBIR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Aerosol Particles, Chemical Composition, Total Gas-Phase Organics (TGO)

Citation Formats

Worsnop, Douglas, Kroll, Jesse, Jimenez, Jose, and Williams, Brent. Volatility-Resolved Measurements of Total Gas-Phase Organic Compounds by High-Resolution Electron Impact Mass Spectrometry. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Worsnop, Douglas, Kroll, Jesse, Jimenez, Jose, & Williams, Brent. Volatility-Resolved Measurements of Total Gas-Phase Organic Compounds by High-Resolution Electron Impact Mass Spectrometry. United States.
Worsnop, Douglas, Kroll, Jesse, Jimenez, Jose, and Williams, Brent. Mon . "Volatility-Resolved Measurements of Total Gas-Phase Organic Compounds by High-Resolution Electron Impact Mass Spectrometry". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1148720,
title = {Volatility-Resolved Measurements of Total Gas-Phase Organic Compounds by High-Resolution Electron Impact Mass Spectrometry},
author = {Worsnop, Douglas and Kroll, Jesse and Jimenez, Jose and Williams, Brent},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 04 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Aug 04 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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