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Title: A Dual-Mode Accelerating Cavity to Test RF Breakdown Dependence on RF Magnetic Fields

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1148708
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-16049
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Conf.Proc.C110904:247-249,2011; Conference: Presented at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC-2011), San Sebastian, Spain, 4-9 Sep 2011
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Accelerators,ACCPHY

Citation Formats

Yeremian, A.D., Dolgashev, V.A., Neilson, J., Tantawi, S.G., and /SLAC. A Dual-Mode Accelerating Cavity to Test RF Breakdown Dependence on RF Magnetic Fields. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Yeremian, A.D., Dolgashev, V.A., Neilson, J., Tantawi, S.G., & /SLAC. A Dual-Mode Accelerating Cavity to Test RF Breakdown Dependence on RF Magnetic Fields. United States.
Yeremian, A.D., Dolgashev, V.A., Neilson, J., Tantawi, S.G., and /SLAC. Mon . "A Dual-Mode Accelerating Cavity to Test RF Breakdown Dependence on RF Magnetic Fields". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1148708.
@article{osti_1148708,
title = {A Dual-Mode Accelerating Cavity to Test RF Breakdown Dependence on RF Magnetic Fields},
author = {Yeremian, A.D. and Dolgashev, V.A. and Neilson, J. and Tantawi, S.G. and /SLAC},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {Conf.Proc.C110904:247-249,2011},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Jul 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
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