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Title: A heterozygous putative null mutation in ROM1 without a mutation in peripherin/RDS in a family with retinitis pigmentosa

Abstract

ROM1 is a 351-amino-acid, 37-kDa outer segment membrane protein of rod photoreceptors. ROM1 is related to peripherin/RDS, another outer segment membrane protein found in both rods and cones. The precise function of ROM1 or peripherin/RDS is not known, but they have been suggested to play important roles in the function and/or structure of the rod photoreceptor outer segment disks. A recent report implicated ROM1 in disease by suggesting that RP can be caused by a heterozygous null mutation in ROM1 but only in combination with another heterozygous mutation in peripherin/RDS. Screening of the ROM1 gene using polymerase chain reaction amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and direct DNA sequencing identified the same heterozygous putative null mutation in a family with RP.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
114857
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genomics; Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: 20 May 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; EYES; HEREDITARY DISEASES; GENE MUTATIONS; DETECTION

Citation Formats

Sakuma, Hitoshi, Inana, G., and Murakami, Akira. A heterozygous putative null mutation in ROM1 without a mutation in peripherin/RDS in a family with retinitis pigmentosa. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.1066.
Sakuma, Hitoshi, Inana, G., & Murakami, Akira. A heterozygous putative null mutation in ROM1 without a mutation in peripherin/RDS in a family with retinitis pigmentosa. United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.1066.
Sakuma, Hitoshi, Inana, G., and Murakami, Akira. Sat . "A heterozygous putative null mutation in ROM1 without a mutation in peripherin/RDS in a family with retinitis pigmentosa". United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.1066.
@article{osti_114857,
title = {A heterozygous putative null mutation in ROM1 without a mutation in peripherin/RDS in a family with retinitis pigmentosa},
author = {Sakuma, Hitoshi and Inana, G. and Murakami, Akira},
abstractNote = {ROM1 is a 351-amino-acid, 37-kDa outer segment membrane protein of rod photoreceptors. ROM1 is related to peripherin/RDS, another outer segment membrane protein found in both rods and cones. The precise function of ROM1 or peripherin/RDS is not known, but they have been suggested to play important roles in the function and/or structure of the rod photoreceptor outer segment disks. A recent report implicated ROM1 in disease by suggesting that RP can be caused by a heterozygous null mutation in ROM1 but only in combination with another heterozygous mutation in peripherin/RDS. Screening of the ROM1 gene using polymerase chain reaction amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and direct DNA sequencing identified the same heterozygous putative null mutation in a family with RP.},
doi = {10.1006/geno.1995.1066},
journal = {Genomics},
number = 2,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat May 20 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Sat May 20 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}
  • In spite of recent advances in identifying genes causing monogenic human disease, very little is known about the genes involved in polygenic disease. Three families were identified with mutations in the unlinked photoreceptor-specific genes ROM 1 and peripherin/RDS, in which only double heterozygotes develop retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These findings indicate that the allelic and nonallelic heterogeneity known to be a feature of monogenic RP is complicated further by interactions between unlinked mutations causing digenic RP. Recognition of the inheritance pattern exemplified by these three families might facilitate the identification of other examples of digenic inheritance in human disease.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by night blindness, an eventual loss of visual field, a diminished response on the electroretinogram, and pigmentary retinal degeneration. These features are primarily explained by the degeneration of photoreceptors. The recent development of the molecular genetic approach has enabled the identification of genes responsible for parts of autosomal dominant RP (ADRP). Rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS genes, in particular, have been successfully shown to cosegregate with ADRP. The authors, therefore, screened 42 unrelated Japanese patients with ADRP to search for mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene. The method we employed for screening was a nonradioisotopic modification of single-strandmore » conformation polymorphism. Among 42 unrelated patients with ADRP, the DNA from one patient (SY) showed an abnormal pattern in exon 2 on SSCP. The DNA fragments were then amplified from affected and nonaffected members of the same family as SY. The alteration in the DNA sequence that was commonly found in the affected members of the family was identified as a heterozygous transversional change of C to A at the third nucleotide in codon 244, resulting in the amino acid replacement of asparagine residue with lysine residue. None of unaffected family members or 30 normal control individuals had this alteration.« less
  • Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients withmore » retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.« less
  • Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealedmore » a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.« less
  • The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150more » patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.« less