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Title: SKOS XSLT and Transforming RDF Resources for use in a Production Semantic Technologies Application.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1148478
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2158C
523375
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Semantic Technology Conference 2007 held May 21-24, 2007 in San Jose, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Arpin, Bettina K, and Linebarger, John M. SKOS XSLT and Transforming RDF Resources for use in a Production Semantic Technologies Application.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Arpin, Bettina K, & Linebarger, John M. SKOS XSLT and Transforming RDF Resources for use in a Production Semantic Technologies Application.. United States.
Arpin, Bettina K, and Linebarger, John M. Sun . "SKOS XSLT and Transforming RDF Resources for use in a Production Semantic Technologies Application.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1148478.
@article{osti_1148478,
title = {SKOS XSLT and Transforming RDF Resources for use in a Production Semantic Technologies Application.},
author = {Arpin, Bettina K and Linebarger, John M.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • With the gasification plant of Greve in Chianti, it is easy to produce electric power, starting from sorghum bagasse and RDF. The experiment demonstrated the possibility of gasifying the biomass sorghum bagasse in CFBG, obtaining a low gas with a sufficiently high heat value. It is possible to use the lean gas, obtained from gasification of sorghum bagasse and RDF, as fuel in the cement production. With the realization of the second line of gas combustion and heat recovery system, the plant will be able to produce electric power of 6,7 MW and thermic treatment about 200 ton/day of RDFmore » or biomass. At the same time the new configuration of the second line will be able to avoid the fouling problems on the boiler section.« less
  • Six facilities, representing the scope of different co-firing techniques with their associated RDF production systems were reviewed in detail for combustion equipment, firing modes, emission control systems, residue handling/disposal, and effluent wastewater treatment. These facilities encompass all currently operational or soon to be operational co-firing plants and associated RDF production systems. Occupational health and safety risks for these plants were evaluated on the basis of fatal and nonfatal accidents and disease arising from the respective fuel cycles, coal and RDF. Occupational risks include exposure to pathogenic organisms in the workplace. Unusual events that are life threatening in the RDF processingmore » industry (e.g., explosions) are also discussed and remedial and safety measures reviewed. 80 refs., 4 figs., 30 tabs.« less
  • This report details the current commercial status of the use of Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF) technologies and the future thermal and biochemical options. RDF is prepared by processing municipal solid waste to modify its size and to separate components which are not desirable. In the simplest form, RDF is sold as a solid fuel which displaces coal. However, coal is an inexpensive and plentiful energy source. Further, since RDF has a lower energy density than coal, substitute in existing boilers normally requires system derating. The options are to use combustion systems designed for RDF or emerging technologies which produce liquid ormore » gaseous fuels. These conversion technologies may be either thermal or biochemical. Each system has a unique set of specifications that are imposed on the feedstock. In this paper the status of these advanced technologies and their preparation needs are discussed.« less
  • Densified refuse-derived fuel (dRDF) is municipal solid waste (MSW) that has undergone several steps of sizing, separation and screening to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) and other soluble or recyclable by-products. The RDF is then densified in a pelletizing or cubing extrusion process. This dRDF product offers several advantages compared to RDF: ease and cost of transportation; increased storability; and the capability of firing in a variety of combustor configurations. This paper discusses the problems encountered with dRDF processing systems; the current status of dRDF facilities; technologies presently used; and the economics of existing systems.