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Title: Elucidating water transport and removal in PEM fuel cells via experiments and modeling.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1147904
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2777C
523224
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 7th Biennial Tri-Laboratory Engineering Conference held May 7-10, 2007 in Albuquerque, NM.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chen, Ken S, Hickner, Michael A, Siegel, Nathan Phillip, and Wang, Chao Yang. Elucidating water transport and removal in PEM fuel cells via experiments and modeling.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Chen, Ken S, Hickner, Michael A, Siegel, Nathan Phillip, & Wang, Chao Yang. Elucidating water transport and removal in PEM fuel cells via experiments and modeling.. United States.
Chen, Ken S, Hickner, Michael A, Siegel, Nathan Phillip, and Wang, Chao Yang. Tue . "Elucidating water transport and removal in PEM fuel cells via experiments and modeling.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1147904.
@article{osti_1147904,
title = {Elucidating water transport and removal in PEM fuel cells via experiments and modeling.},
author = {Chen, Ken S and Hickner, Michael A and Siegel, Nathan Phillip and Wang, Chao Yang},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Abstract not provided.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • The process of removing liquid water droplets in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) is examined using a simple analytical model and two-dimensional simulations. Specifically, the stability of a droplet adhering to the wall of the cathode flow channel is examined as a function of the geometry of the flow channel, the applied pressure gradient, and the wetting properties. The result is a prediction of the critical droplet size as a function of the difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, or contact angle hysteresis. The analytical model is shown to qualitatively predict this stability limit when compared to two-dimensionalmore » simulation results. The simulations are performed using both Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods and level set methods. The ALE and level set predictions are shown to be in good agreement.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, viamore » direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared model prediction with experimental data obtained in our laboratory and from literature. Moreover, we developed a one-dimensional analytical model for predicting electrochemical performance of an idealized PEMFC with small surface over-potentials. Furthermore, we developed a multi-dimensional computer model, which is based on the finite-element method and a fully-coupled implicit solution scheme via Newton's technique, for simulating the performance of PEMFCs. We demonstrated utility of our finite-element model by comparing the computed current density distribution and overall polarization with those measured using a segmented cell. In the last part of this report, we document an exploratory experimental study on MEA (membrane electrode assembly) degradation.« less