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Title: Operations at Scale; Lessons to be Remembered.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1147852
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-3069C
522951
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the The 8th LCI International Conference on High-Performance Computing held May 14-18, 2007 in Lake Tahoe, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ballance, Robert A., and Noe, John P. Operations at Scale; Lessons to be Remembered.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Ballance, Robert A., & Noe, John P. Operations at Scale; Lessons to be Remembered.. United States.
Ballance, Robert A., and Noe, John P. Tue . "Operations at Scale; Lessons to be Remembered.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1147852.
@article{osti_1147852,
title = {Operations at Scale; Lessons to be Remembered.},
author = {Ballance, Robert A. and Noe, John P.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • No abstract prepared.