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Title: Structure of open-cell foams with finite density.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1147820
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-3378C
522696
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the ASME Applied Mechanics and Materials Conference -- McMat 2007 held June 3-7, 2007 in Austin, TX.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kraynik, Andrew M. Structure of open-cell foams with finite density.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Kraynik, Andrew M. Structure of open-cell foams with finite density.. United States.
Kraynik, Andrew M. Tue . "Structure of open-cell foams with finite density.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1147820.
@article{osti_1147820,
title = {Structure of open-cell foams with finite density.},
author = {Kraynik, Andrew M.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.
  • High energy physics applications at the Department of Energy National Laboratories require unique low-density foams of demanding homogeneity specifications (cell sizes on the order of 10 {mu}m or smaller). These delicate and fragile foams are machined and shaped into specimens to exacting tolerances. In this work, the mechanical properties of a variety of these low density microcellular foams are reported as functions of foam density and morphology.
  • High energy physics applications at the Department of Energy National Laboratories require unique low-density foams of demanding homogeneity specifications (cell sizes on the order of 10 {mu}m or smaller). These delicate and fragile foams are machined and shaped into specimens to exacting tolerances. In this work, the mechanical properties of a variety of these low density microcellular foams are reported as functions of foam density and morphology.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • The carbon density and the carbon distribution in low-density foams that were manufactured by a modified salt-replica process were determined by bulk measurements of weight and volume and by x-ray computed tomography (CT). When determining the carbon density, both methods yielded similar results, however, the high spatial resolution of CT was found to yield nondestructive quantitative information on the carbon distribution that was not available from bulk measurements. The highest and lowest foam densities were found to occur at the edges and the interior, respectively. The carbon density at the edge was found to be a few percent up tomore » 20 percent higher than the average foam density. The percentage of carbon buildup at the edge was determined to be inversely proportional to the foal density, and in addition, the gradient compared favorably with calculations from Fick's second low of diffusion. A calculated diffusion coefficient was interpreted in terms of foam manufacturing in the modified salt-replica process. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less