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Title: Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

Abstract

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1147365
Report Number(s):
SAND2014-0439
498318
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lewis, Tom Goslee,, and Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1147365.
Lewis, Tom Goslee,, & Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.. United States. doi:10.2172/1147365.
Lewis, Tom Goslee,, and Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,. 2014. "Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.". United States. doi:10.2172/1147365. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1147365.
@article{osti_1147365,
title = {Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.},
author = {Lewis, Tom Goslee, and Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,},
abstractNote = {This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.},
doi = {10.2172/1147365},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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