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Title: Compensation for time-dependent radiation drive asymmetries in inertial fusion capsules.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1137237
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2162J
Journal ID: ISSN 0031--9007; 523860
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 17; Related Information: Proposed for publication in Physical Review Letters.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Slutz, Stephen A., Vesey, Roger A., and Herrmann, Mark. Compensation for time-dependent radiation drive asymmetries in inertial fusion capsules.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.175001.
Slutz, Stephen A., Vesey, Roger A., & Herrmann, Mark. Compensation for time-dependent radiation drive asymmetries in inertial fusion capsules.. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.175001.
Slutz, Stephen A., Vesey, Roger A., and Herrmann, Mark. Sun . "Compensation for time-dependent radiation drive asymmetries in inertial fusion capsules.". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.175001.
@article{osti_1137237,
title = {Compensation for time-dependent radiation drive asymmetries in inertial fusion capsules.},
author = {Slutz, Stephen A. and Vesey, Roger A. and Herrmann, Mark},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.175001},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 17,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Abstract not provided.
  • An approach is presented to design inertial-fusion capsules compensated for time-dependent radiation-drive asymmetries. This approach uses in depth variable doping of the capsule ablator, i.e., the addition of small amounts of material to tailor the opacity. Simulations show that an inertial-fusion capsule, using a beryllium ablator variably doped with gold, can be designed to compensate for a constant P{sub 2} radiation asymmetry as high as 20% and still produce nominal yield (80% of a symmetrically driven capsule). In contrast, without variable doping the P{sub 2} asymmetry must be less than 2% to obtain nominal yield. Similarly encouraging results are obtainedmore » for modes P{sub 1}, P{sub 4}, and P{sub 6}. Simulations also demonstrate that variable doping can compensate for nearly arbitrary time-dependent radiation-drive asymmetries by varying the polar dependence of the doping fraction with depth.« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • The x-ray drive on a capsule in an inertial confinement fusion setup is crucial for ignition. Unfortunately, a direct measurement has not been possible so far. We propose an angular radiation temperature simulation to predict the time-dependent drive on the capsule. A simple model, based on the view-factor method for the simulation of the radiation temperature, is presented and compared with the experimental data obtained using the OMEGA laser facility and the simulation results acquired with VISRAD code. We found a good agreement between the time-dependent measurements and the simulation results obtained using this model. The validated model was thenmore » used to analyze the experimental results from the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. More specifically, the variations of the peak radiation temperatures at different view angles with the albedo of the hohlraum, the motion of the laser spots, the closure of the laser entrance holes, and the deviation of the laser power were investigated. Furthermore, the time-dependent radiation temperature at different orientations and the drive history on the capsule were calculated. The results indicate that the radiation temperature from “U20W112” (named according to the diagnostic hole ID on the target chamber) can be used to approximately predict the drive temperature on the capsule. In addition, the influence of the capsule on the peak radiation temperature is also presented.« less