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Title: Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [6];  [4];  [8];  [9]
  1. Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  3. Department of Physics, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana
  4. ISIS & icFRC, Universite de Strasbourg and CNRS, 8, allee Monge, Strasbourg, France
  5. Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois
  6. Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, CNRS, ENS, UPMC, Campus Jussieu, Paris France
  7. ISOF-CNR, via Gobetti 101, Bologna, Italy
  8. Department of Physics, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana / Laboratoire Univers et Theories (LUTH), Observatoire de Paris
  9. Halliburton, Houston (TX).
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1136960
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-14-25269
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Materials Science(36); Material Science

Citation Formats

Behunin, R, Dalvit, Diego A., Decca, R, Genet, C., Jung, I., Lambrecht, A., Liscio, A., Reynaud, S., Schnoering, G., Voisin, G., and Zeng, Y. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1136960.
Behunin, R, Dalvit, Diego A., Decca, R, Genet, C., Jung, I., Lambrecht, A., Liscio, A., Reynaud, S., Schnoering, G., Voisin, G., & Zeng, Y. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements. United States. doi:10.2172/1136960.
Behunin, R, Dalvit, Diego A., Decca, R, Genet, C., Jung, I., Lambrecht, A., Liscio, A., Reynaud, S., Schnoering, G., Voisin, G., and Zeng, Y. Mon . "Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements". United States. doi:10.2172/1136960. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1136960.
@article{osti_1136960,
title = {Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements},
author = {Behunin, R and Dalvit, Diego A. and Decca, R and Genet, C. and Jung, I. and Lambrecht, A. and Liscio, A. and Reynaud, S. and Schnoering, G. and Voisin, G. and Zeng, Y.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.2172/1136960},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 14 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Jul 14 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Cited by 17
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