skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

Abstract

Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of interrow shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from interrow shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of interrow shading mismatch is at a maximum.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1136207
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5J00-62171
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, 8 - 13 June 2014, Denver, Colorado; Related Information: NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 42 ENGINEERING; MAXIM; PARTIAL SHADING; MLPE; EMBEDDED POWER ELECTRONICS; PV SYSTEM PERFORMANCE; DIFFUSE VIEW FACTOR

Citation Formats

Deline, C., Sekulic, B., Barkaszi, S., Yang, J., and Kahn, S. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation). United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Deline, C., Sekulic, B., Barkaszi, S., Yang, J., & Kahn, S. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation). United States.
Deline, C., Sekulic, B., Barkaszi, S., Yang, J., and Kahn, S. Sun . "Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1136207.
@article{osti_1136207,
title = {Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)},
author = {Deline, C. and Sekulic, B. and Barkaszi, S. and Yang, J. and Kahn, S.},
abstractNote = {Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of interrow shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from interrow shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of interrow shading mismatch is at a maximum.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of inter-row shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage-ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from inter-row shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons withmore » published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of inter-row shading mismatch is at a maximum.« less
  • This presentation offers an overview of the Regional Test Centers project for Small Wind Turbine testing and certification.
  • This paper presents the testing results of an all-silicon carbide (SiC) intelligent power module (IPM) for use in future high-density power electronics applications. The IPM has high-temperature capability and contains both SiC power devices and SiC gate driver integrated circuits (ICs). The high-temperature capability of the SiC gate driver ICs allows for them to be packaged into the power module and be located physically close to the power devices. This provides a distinct advantage by reducing the gate driver loop inductance, which promotes high frequency operation, while also reducing the overall volume of the system through higher levels of integration.more » The power module was tested in a bridgeless-boost converter to showcase the performance of the module in a system level application. The converter was initially operated with a switching frequency of 200 kHz with a peak output power of approximately 5 kW. The efficiency of the converter was then evaluated experimentally and optimized by increasing the overdrive voltage on the SiC gate driver ICs. Overall a peak efficiency of 97.7% was measured at 3.0 kW output. The converter s switching frequency was then increased to 500 kHz to prove the high frequency capability of the power module was then pushed to its limits and operated at a switching frequency of 500 kHz. With no further optimization of components, the converter was able to operate under these conditions and showed a peak efficiency of 95.0% at an output power of 2.1 kW.« less
  • This paper presents a high-temperature capable intelligent power module that contains SiC power devices and SiC gate driver integrated circuits (ICs). The high-temperature capability of the SiC gate driver ICs allows for them to be packaged into the power module and be located physically close to the power devices. This provides a distinct advantage by reducing the gate driver loop inductance, which promotes high frequency operation, while also reducing the overall volume of the system through higher levels of integration. The power module was tested in a bridgeless-boost converter (Fig. 1) to determine the performance of the module in amore » system level application. The converter was operated with a switching frequency of 200 kHz with a peak output power of approximately 5 kW. The peak efficiency was found to be 97.5% at 2.9 kW.« less
  • Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.