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Title: #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

Abstract

Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid.This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOEOED (Office of Economic Impact and Diversity)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1133076
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; WOMEN IN STEM; ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING; USDOE; #WOMENINSTEM

Citation Formats

Jordan, Rhonda. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Jordan, Rhonda. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe. United States.
Jordan, Rhonda. Tue . "#WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1133076.
@article{osti_1133076,
title = {#WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe},
author = {Jordan, Rhonda},
abstractNote = {Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid.This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 27 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue May 27 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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