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Title: Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

Abstract

Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1132765
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FOAM; LLNL; ENERGY ABSORBING MATERIALS; 3D-PRINT; ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING; NEW MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Duoss, Eric. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Duoss, Eric. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials. United States.
Duoss, Eric. 2014. "Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1132765.
@article{osti_1132765,
title = {Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials},
author = {Duoss, Eric},
abstractNote = {Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month = 5
}
  • A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.
  • Foams are, by nature, disordered materials studded with air pockets of varying sizes. Lack of control over the material’s architecture at the micrometer or nanometer scale can make it difficult to adjust the foam’s basic properties. But Eric Duoss and a team of Livermore researchers are using additive manufacturing to develop “smarter” silicone cushions. By architecting the structure at the micro scale, they are able to control macro-scale properties previously unachievable with foam materials.
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