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Title: A diagnostic for quantifying heat flux from a thermite spray

Abstract

Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors cannot survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite sprays are reported. Results indicate that this newly designed heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability suitable for characterizing energetic material combustion.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1131309
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-14-32024
Journal ID: ISSN 0957--0233
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Measurement Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; thermite spray

Citation Formats

E. P. Nixon, M. L. Pantoya, D. J. Prentice, E. D. Steffler, M. A. Daniels, and S. P. D'Arche. A diagnostic for quantifying heat flux from a thermite spray. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1088/0957-0233/21/2/025202.
E. P. Nixon, M. L. Pantoya, D. J. Prentice, E. D. Steffler, M. A. Daniels, & S. P. D'Arche. A diagnostic for quantifying heat flux from a thermite spray. United States. doi:10.1088/0957-0233/21/2/025202.
E. P. Nixon, M. L. Pantoya, D. J. Prentice, E. D. Steffler, M. A. Daniels, and S. P. D'Arche. Mon . "A diagnostic for quantifying heat flux from a thermite spray". United States. doi:10.1088/0957-0233/21/2/025202.
@article{osti_1131309,
title = {A diagnostic for quantifying heat flux from a thermite spray},
author = {E. P. Nixon and M. L. Pantoya and D. J. Prentice and E. D. Steffler and M. A. Daniels and S. P. D'Arche},
abstractNote = {Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors cannot survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite sprays are reported. Results indicate that this newly designed heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability suitable for characterizing energetic material combustion.},
doi = {10.1088/0957-0233/21/2/025202},
journal = {Measurement Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}