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Title: Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions

Abstract

We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1130713
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-93356
400409900
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: BioScience, 10(10):6323-6337
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Smith, Steven J., and Rothwell, Andrew J.. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.5194/bg-10-6323-2013.
Smith, Steven J., & Rothwell, Andrew J.. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions. United States. doi:10.5194/bg-10-6323-2013.
Smith, Steven J., and Rothwell, Andrew J.. Tue . "Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions". United States. doi:10.5194/bg-10-6323-2013.
@article{osti_1130713,
title = {Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions},
author = {Smith, Steven J. and Rothwell, Andrew J.},
abstractNote = {We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product},
doi = {10.5194/bg-10-6323-2013},
journal = {BioScience, 10(10):6323-6337},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 08 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Tue Oct 08 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
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