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Title: Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. (Cal. State)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NSFOTHER U.S. STATESDOE - BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH
OSTI Identifier:
1126809
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Biol. Chem.; Journal Volume: 289; Journal Issue: (13) ; 03, 2014
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

McNamara, Dan E., Cascio, Duilio, Jorda, Julien, Bustos, Cheene, Wang, Tzu-Chi, Rasche, Madeline E., Yeates, Todd O., Bobik, Thomas A., UCLA), and Iowa State). Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1074/jbc.M113.522342.
McNamara, Dan E., Cascio, Duilio, Jorda, Julien, Bustos, Cheene, Wang, Tzu-Chi, Rasche, Madeline E., Yeates, Todd O., Bobik, Thomas A., UCLA), & Iowa State). Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer. United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M113.522342.
McNamara, Dan E., Cascio, Duilio, Jorda, Julien, Bustos, Cheene, Wang, Tzu-Chi, Rasche, Madeline E., Yeates, Todd O., Bobik, Thomas A., UCLA), and Iowa State). Tue . "Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer". United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M113.522342.
@article{osti_1126809,
title = {Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer},
author = {McNamara, Dan E. and Cascio, Duilio and Jorda, Julien and Bustos, Cheene and Wang, Tzu-Chi and Rasche, Madeline E. and Yeates, Todd O. and Bobik, Thomas A. and UCLA) and Iowa State)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1074/jbc.M113.522342},
journal = {J. Biol. Chem.},
number = (13) ; 03, 2014,
volume = 289,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Tue Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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