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Title: CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation

Abstract

The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and themore » model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. U.S. DOE
  2. REM Engineering PLLC
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research; National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1126690
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-762
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 38th International Technical Conference on Clean Coal & Fuel Systems, Clearwater, FL, June 2, 2013
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT

Citation Formats

Breault, Ronald W,, Huckaby, Ernest D., Shadle, Lawrence J, and Spenik, James L. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Breault, Ronald W,, Huckaby, Ernest D., Shadle, Lawrence J, & Spenik, James L. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation. United States.
Breault, Ronald W,, Huckaby, Ernest D., Shadle, Lawrence J, and Spenik, James L. 2013. "CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1126690,
title = {CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation},
author = {Breault, Ronald W, and Huckaby, Ernest D. and Shadle, Lawrence J and Spenik, James L.},
abstractNote = {The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and the model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 1
}

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