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Title: Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation

Abstract

The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identifymore » the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Maryland
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1124192
Report Number(s):
DOE-UMD-ER54672
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-02ER54672
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Haber, Irving. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/1124192.
Haber, Irving. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation. United States. doi:10.2172/1124192.
Haber, Irving. Sat . "Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation". United States. doi:10.2172/1124192. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1124192.
@article{osti_1124192,
title = {Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation},
author = {Haber, Irving},
abstractNote = {The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identify the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.},
doi = {10.2172/1124192},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 31 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Sat Oct 31 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}

Technical Report:

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