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Title: Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of our Solar System

Abstract

Sample-return missions and natural collection processes have provided us with a surprisingly extensive collection of matter from Solar System bodies other than the Earth. These collections include samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, interplanetary dust, and, recently, from the Sun (solar wind) and a comet. This presentation will describe some of these materials, how they were collected, and what we have learned from them. Synchrotron radiation analyses of these materials are playing an increasingly valuable role in unraveling the histories and properities of the parent Solar System bodies.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Chicago
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ANL (Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)); Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1122571
DOE Contract Number:
ACO2-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: APS Colloquium Series, Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States), presented on April 05, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Sutton, Stephen R. Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of our Solar System. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Sutton, Stephen R. Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of our Solar System. United States.
Sutton, Stephen R. Wed . "Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of our Solar System". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1122571.
@article{osti_1122571,
title = {Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of our Solar System},
author = {Sutton, Stephen R.},
abstractNote = {Sample-return missions and natural collection processes have provided us with a surprisingly extensive collection of matter from Solar System bodies other than the Earth. These collections include samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, interplanetary dust, and, recently, from the Sun (solar wind) and a comet. This presentation will describe some of these materials, how they were collected, and what we have learned from them. Synchrotron radiation analyses of these materials are playing an increasingly valuable role in unraveling the histories and properities of the parent Solar System bodies.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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