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Title: Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center)

Abstract

The "location" of the radar is the reference location to which the radar measures range. This is typically the antenna's "phase center". However, the antenna's phase center is not generally obvious, and may not correspond to any seemingly obvious physical location, such as the focal point of a dish reflector. This report calculates the phase center of an offset-fed dish reflector antenna.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1121968
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-10635
493252
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin Walter. Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center). United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1121968.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center). United States. doi:10.2172/1121968.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Sun . "Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center)". United States. doi:10.2172/1121968. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1121968.
@article{osti_1121968,
title = {Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center)},
author = {Doerry, Armin Walter},
abstractNote = {The "location" of the radar is the reference location to which the radar measures range. This is typically the antenna's "phase center". However, the antenna's phase center is not generally obvious, and may not correspond to any seemingly obvious physical location, such as the focal point of a dish reflector. This report calculates the phase center of an offset-fed dish reflector antenna.},
doi = {10.2172/1121968},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Sun Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}

Technical Report:

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