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Title: Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

Abstract

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scalingmore » up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1121879
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-926
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Guenther, Chris, and Garg, Rahul. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1121879.
Guenther, Chris, & Garg, Rahul. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows. United States. doi:10.2172/1121879.
Guenther, Chris, and Garg, Rahul. Mon . "Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows". United States. doi:10.2172/1121879. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1121879.
@article{osti_1121879,
title = {Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows},
author = {Guenther, Chris and Garg, Rahul},
abstractNote = {The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.},
doi = {10.2172/1121879},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The flow of solids loaded suspension in cylindrical pipes has been the object of intense experimental and theoretical investigations in recent years. These types of flows are of great interest in chemical engineering because of their important use in many industrial manufacturing processes. Such flows are for example encountered in the manufacture of solid-rocket propellants, advanced ceramics, reinforced polymer composites, in heterogenous catalytic reactors, and in the pipeline transport of liquid-solids suspensions. In most cases, the suspension microstructure and the degree of solids dispersion greatly affect the final performance of the manufactured product. For example, solid propellant pellets need tomore » be extremely-well dispersed in gel matrices for use as rocket engine solid fuels. The homogeneity of pellet dispersion is critical to allow good uniformity of the burn rate, which in turn affects the final mechanical performance of the engine. Today`s manufacturing of such fuels uses continuous flow processes rather than batch processes. Unfortunately, the hydrodynamics of such flow processes is poorly understood and is difficult to assess because it requires the simultaneous measurements of liquid/solids phase velocities and volume fractions. Due to the recent development in pulsed Fourier Transform NMR imaging, NMR imaging is now becoming a powerful technique for the non intrusive investigation of multi-phase flows. This paper reports and exposes a state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methodology that can be used to study such flows. The hydrodynamic model developed for this study is a two-phase flow shear thinning model with standard constitutive fluid/solids interphase drag and solids compaction stresses. this model shows good agreement with experimental data and the limitations of this model are discussed.« less
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  • Fifty-four million gallons of wastes containing 180-million curies of radioactivity are stored in single (SSTs)- and double-shell underground tanks (DSTs) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in eastern Washington (Gephart and Lundgren 1997). They are a multiphase, multicomponent, high-ionic strength, and highly basic mixture of liquids, solids, and, in some cases, gases. Mixer pumps will be installed in twenty-eight 4,0000-m DSTs to stir radioactive sludge/saltcake and supernatant liquid (and possibly a solvent) so the waste can be retrieved from the tanks for subsequent treatment and disposal. During the retrieval operation, complex interactions occur between waste mixing, chemical reactions,more » and rheology. Thus, decisions made about waste retrieval must account for these complex interactions.« less
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