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Title: Tracking Hazard Analysis Data in a Jungle of Changing Design

Abstract

The biggest fear of the hazard analyst is the loss of data in the middle of the design jungle. When project schedules are demanding and design is changing rapidly it is essential that the hazard analysis data be tracked and kept current in order to provide the required project design, development, and regulatory support. Being able to identify the current information, as well as the past archived information, as the design progresses and to be able to show how the project is designing in safety through modifications based on hazard analysis results is imperative. At the DOE Hanford site in Washington State, Flour Hanford Inc is in the process of the removal and disposition of sludge from the 100 Area K Basins. The K Basins were used to store spent fuel from the operating reactors at the Hanford Site. The sludge is a by-product from the corrosion of the fuel and fuel storage canisters. The sludge removal project has been very dynamic involving the design, procurement and, more recently, the operation of processes at two basins, K East and K West. The project has an ambitious schedule with a large number of changes to design concepts. In order to supportmore » the complex K Basins project a technique to track the status of the hazard analysis data was developed. This paper will identify the most important elements of the tracking system and how it was used to assist the project in ensuring that current design data was reflected in a specific version of the hazard analysis and to show how the project was keeping up with the design and ensuring compliance with the requirements to design in safety. While the specifics of the data tracking strategy for the K Basins sludge removal project will be described in the paper, the general concepts of the strategy are applicable to similar projects requiring iteration of hazard analysis and design.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1121024
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-46997
830403000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Management (PSAM), May 14-18, 2006, New Orleans, Louisiana, Paper No. PSAM-0460
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
hazard analysis; design change; safety requirements

Citation Formats

Sullivan, Robin S., and Young, Jonathan. Tracking Hazard Analysis Data in a Jungle of Changing Design. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1115/1.802442.
Sullivan, Robin S., & Young, Jonathan. Tracking Hazard Analysis Data in a Jungle of Changing Design. United States. doi:10.1115/1.802442.
Sullivan, Robin S., and Young, Jonathan. Sun . "Tracking Hazard Analysis Data in a Jungle of Changing Design". United States. doi:10.1115/1.802442.
@article{osti_1121024,
title = {Tracking Hazard Analysis Data in a Jungle of Changing Design},
author = {Sullivan, Robin S. and Young, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {The biggest fear of the hazard analyst is the loss of data in the middle of the design jungle. When project schedules are demanding and design is changing rapidly it is essential that the hazard analysis data be tracked and kept current in order to provide the required project design, development, and regulatory support. Being able to identify the current information, as well as the past archived information, as the design progresses and to be able to show how the project is designing in safety through modifications based on hazard analysis results is imperative. At the DOE Hanford site in Washington State, Flour Hanford Inc is in the process of the removal and disposition of sludge from the 100 Area K Basins. The K Basins were used to store spent fuel from the operating reactors at the Hanford Site. The sludge is a by-product from the corrosion of the fuel and fuel storage canisters. The sludge removal project has been very dynamic involving the design, procurement and, more recently, the operation of processes at two basins, K East and K West. The project has an ambitious schedule with a large number of changes to design concepts. In order to support the complex K Basins project a technique to track the status of the hazard analysis data was developed. This paper will identify the most important elements of the tracking system and how it was used to assist the project in ensuring that current design data was reflected in a specific version of the hazard analysis and to show how the project was keeping up with the design and ensuring compliance with the requirements to design in safety. While the specifics of the data tracking strategy for the K Basins sludge removal project will be described in the paper, the general concepts of the strategy are applicable to similar projects requiring iteration of hazard analysis and design.},
doi = {10.1115/1.802442},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sun May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Conference:
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