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Title: Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

Abstract

The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
11210
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/CP-98155
TRN: US0104349
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Materials Research Society 1998 Fall Meeting, Boston, MA (US), 11/30/1998--12/04/1998; Other Information: PBD: 8 Jan 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AMBIENT TEMPERATURE; DIAMONDS; HEAVY IONS; GRAPHITE; IRRADIATION; LIQUID CRYSTALS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PARTICLE TRACKS; FABRICATION; RADIATION EFFECTS; KRYPTON IONS

Citation Formats

Daulton, T L. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Daulton, T L. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.. United States.
Daulton, T L. Fri . "Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/11210.
@article{osti_11210,
title = {Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.},
author = {Daulton, T L},
abstractNote = {The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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