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Title: Effects of Suprathermal Ions in Fusion Plasmas.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1117576
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-9573C
481173
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 55th APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting held November 11-15, 2013 in Denver, CO.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Knapp, Patrick, Sinars, Daniel Brian, Hahn, Kelly Denise, and Schmit, Paul. Effects of Suprathermal Ions in Fusion Plasmas.. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Knapp, Patrick, Sinars, Daniel Brian, Hahn, Kelly Denise, & Schmit, Paul. Effects of Suprathermal Ions in Fusion Plasmas.. United States.
Knapp, Patrick, Sinars, Daniel Brian, Hahn, Kelly Denise, and Schmit, Paul. Fri . "Effects of Suprathermal Ions in Fusion Plasmas.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1117576.
@article{osti_1117576,
title = {Effects of Suprathermal Ions in Fusion Plasmas.},
author = {Knapp, Patrick and Sinars, Daniel Brian and Hahn, Kelly Denise and Schmit, Paul},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Two basic plasma topics important to the understanding of laser plasma coupling are suprathermal electron generation and nonlinear ion waves. Some old and new results are discussed, including hot electron generation in hohlraum targets. 19 refs., 10 figs.
  • Several crucial properties of suprathermal (> 500 keV) fusion-products are explored, both in their initial phase and during their slowing-down period. A guiding center drift theory, which predicts the effect of energy loss on the motion of these suprathermals, is derived for a low-..beta.., symmetric (non-ripple) tokamak. Velocity-space scattering is ignored. Among the important implications of this theory are: (1) the net inward drift of fusion particles during their slow-down phase and (2) the importance of the plasma density and temperature in determining this drift. The effect the inward drifting has on the spatial profile for the suprathermals approaching thermalmore » energies, on the energy distribution, and on the plasma heating profile is demonstrated for five reactor cases, ranging from near-term low-current devices to conceptual power reactors.« less
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