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Title: Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source

Abstract

We propose to demonstrate a novel x-ray and gamma-ray light source based on laser-plasma electron acceleration and Compton scattering at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. This will provide a new versatile and compact light source capability at the laboratory with very broad scientific applications that are of interest to many disciplines. The source’s synchronization with the seed laser system at a femtosecond time scale (i-e, at which chemical reactions occur) will allow scientists to perform pump-probe experiments with x-ray and gamma-ray beams. Across the laboratory, this will be a new tool for nuclear science, high energy density physics, chemistry, biology, or weapons studies.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1116870
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-428107
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Albert, F., Froula, D. H., Hartemann, F. V., and Joshi, C. Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/1116870.
Albert, F., Froula, D. H., Hartemann, F. V., & Joshi, C. Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source. United States. doi:10.2172/1116870.
Albert, F., Froula, D. H., Hartemann, F. V., and Joshi, C. Tue . "Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source". United States. doi:10.2172/1116870. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1116870.
@article{osti_1116870,
title = {Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source},
author = {Albert, F. and Froula, D. H. and Hartemann, F. V. and Joshi, C.},
abstractNote = {We propose to demonstrate a novel x-ray and gamma-ray light source based on laser-plasma electron acceleration and Compton scattering at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. This will provide a new versatile and compact light source capability at the laboratory with very broad scientific applications that are of interest to many disciplines. The source’s synchronization with the seed laser system at a femtosecond time scale (i-e, at which chemical reactions occur) will allow scientists to perform pump-probe experiments with x-ray and gamma-ray beams. Across the laboratory, this will be a new tool for nuclear science, high energy density physics, chemistry, biology, or weapons studies.},
doi = {10.2172/1116870},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 13 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Tue Apr 13 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scatteringmore » (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. As a result, the same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10–20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10–15 eV range, in a ~4 × 22 m 2 footprint system.« less
  • Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those withmore » other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.« less
  • Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10{sup 22} s{sup -1} are predicted, with a peak brightness > 10{sup 20} photons/(mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x s x 0.1% bandwidth).
  • This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective is to generate a large flux of tunable, monochromatic x-rays for use in mammography and coronary angiography. The approach is based on Compton backscattering of an ultraviolet solid-state laser beam against the high-brightness 20-MeV electron beams from a compact linear accelerator. The direct Compton backscatter approach failed to produce a large flux of x-rays due to the low photon flux of the scattering solid-state laser. The authors have modified the design of a compact x-ray sourcemore » to the new Compton backscattering geometry with use of a regenerative amplifier free-electron laser. They have successfully demonstrated the production of a large flux of infrared photons and a high-brightness electron beam focused in both dimensions for performing Compton backscattering in a regenerative amplifier geometry.« less