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Title: An X-band Crevasse Detection Radar for the Arctic and Antarctic.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1115670
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-2999C
479843
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2013 IEEE Radar Conference, RadarCon2013 held April 29 - May 3, 2013 in Ottawa, Canada.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rohwer, Judd A., Bickel, Douglas Lloyd, Bielek, Timothy P., and Thompson, Martin E. An X-band Crevasse Detection Radar for the Arctic and Antarctic.. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1109/RADAR.2013.6586035.
Rohwer, Judd A., Bickel, Douglas Lloyd, Bielek, Timothy P., & Thompson, Martin E. An X-band Crevasse Detection Radar for the Arctic and Antarctic.. United States. doi:10.1109/RADAR.2013.6586035.
Rohwer, Judd A., Bickel, Douglas Lloyd, Bielek, Timothy P., and Thompson, Martin E. Mon . "An X-band Crevasse Detection Radar for the Arctic and Antarctic.". United States. doi:10.1109/RADAR.2013.6586035. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1115670.
@article{osti_1115670,
title = {An X-band Crevasse Detection Radar for the Arctic and Antarctic.},
author = {Rohwer, Judd A. and Bickel, Douglas Lloyd and Bielek, Timothy P. and Thompson, Martin E.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.1109/RADAR.2013.6586035},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
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