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Title: In-situ atomic force microscopy study of surface microstructure stability on LiMn2O4 thin films.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1115070
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-9010C
477244
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 224th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society held October 27 - November 1, 2013 in San Francisco, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Velmurugan, Jeyavel, Garcia, Robert M, and Missert, Nancy A. In-situ atomic force microscopy study of surface microstructure stability on LiMn2O4 thin films.. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Velmurugan, Jeyavel, Garcia, Robert M, & Missert, Nancy A. In-situ atomic force microscopy study of surface microstructure stability on LiMn2O4 thin films.. United States.
Velmurugan, Jeyavel, Garcia, Robert M, and Missert, Nancy A. Tue . "In-situ atomic force microscopy study of surface microstructure stability on LiMn2O4 thin films.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1115070.
@article{osti_1115070,
title = {In-situ atomic force microscopy study of surface microstructure stability on LiMn2O4 thin films.},
author = {Velmurugan, Jeyavel and Garcia, Robert M and Missert, Nancy A.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Tue Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Abstract not provided.
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  • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine in-situ the correlation between the surface dimensions of defects in dielectric multilayer optical coatings and their susceptibility to damage by pulsed laser illumination. The primary surface defects studied were [mu]m-scale domes associated with the classic nodule defect. The optical film studied was a highly reflective dielectric multilayer consisting of pairs of alternating HfO[sub 2] and SiO[sub 2] layers of quarter wave thickness at 1.06 [mu]m. Nodule defect height and width dimensions were measured prior to laser illumination on two different samples. Correlation between these dimensions supported a simple model for the defectmore » geometry. Defects with high nodule heights ([gt] 0.6 [mu]m) were found to be most susceptible to laser damage over a range of fluences between 0-35 J/cm[sup 2] (1.06 [mu]m, 10 ns, and 1/e[sup 2] diam. of 1.3 mm). Crater defects, formed by nodules ejected from the coating prior to illumination, were also studied. None of the crater defects damaged when illuminated over the same range of fluences that the nodule defects were subjected to.« less
  • Orthoclase (001) surface topography and interface structure were measured during dissolution by using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotrons X-ray reflectivity at pH 1.1-12.9 and T = 25-84 C. Terrace roughening at low pH and step motion at high pH were the main phenomena observed, and dissolution rates were measured precisely. Contrasting dissolution mechanisms are inferred for low- and high-pH conditions. These observations clarify differences in alkali feldspar dissolution mechanisms as a function of pH, demonstrate a new in situ method for measuring face-specific dissolution rates on single crystals, and improve the fundamental basis for understanding alkali feldsparmore » weathering processes.« less
  • Atomic force microscopy was used to determine in situ the nm-scale morphological changes that occur on dielectric optical coatings as a result of laser-induced damage. The optical film studied was a highly reflective dielectric multilayer mirror (HR) consisting of many alternating HfO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} layers of quarter-wave thickness at 1.06 {mu}m. The top layer was a {lambda}/2 SiO{sub 2} overcoat. Laser beam specifications were: 1.06 {mu}m wavelength, 8 ns pulselength, and 110 {mu}m to 300 {mu}m beam diameter. The laser fluence was determined by beam profiling and total energy measurements. The maximum scan-range of the AFM was 80more » {mu}m. A survey of the as-deposited surface shows mostly hillocks of approximately 200 nm width and 10 nm height. Comparison of this hillock structure to that of a single layer of SiO{sub 2} and a surface layer of HfO{sub 2} was made. Irregularities (i.e. defects) on the surface of the HR consisted of {mu}m-scale domes, and occasional craters, of {mu}m planar dimension and depth extending over many layers. Three types of coating defects were identified which could be related to the classic nodule-type coating defect. Nodule defects were found to be easily ejected from the coating surface by laser illumination, leaving craters from which further damage would propagate. After laser damage with fluences above 30 J/cm{sup 2} the hillocks coalesced into structures with heights and widths 5--10 times that of the as-deposited film. A pattern of concentric surface distortions appeared at higher fluences, in some cases following the full circumference of the beam. 14 refs., 9 figs.« less