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Title: A survey of students` ethical attitudes using computer-related scenarios

Abstract

Many studies exist that examine ethical beliefs and attitudes of university students ascending medium or large institutions. There are also many studies which examine ethical attitudes and beliefs of computer science and computer information systems majors. None, however, examines ethical attitudes of university students (regardless of undergraduate major) at a small, Christian, liberal arts institution regarding computer-related situations. This paper will present data accumulated by an on-going study in which students are presented seven scenarios--all of which involve some aspect of computing technology. These students were randomly selected from a small, Christian, liberal-arts university.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
111328
Report Number(s):
CONF-941133-
TRN: 95:005753-0002
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Meeting on ethics in the computer age, Gatlinburg, TN (United States), 11-13 Nov 1994; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of Ethics in the computer age. Conference proceedings; Kizza, J.M. [ed.]; PB: 219 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; COMPUTERS; ETHICAL ASPECTS; SOCIAL IMPACT; PROGRAMMING; COMPUTER NETWORKS; SECURITY; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; EDUCATION

Citation Formats

Hanchey, C.M., and Kingsbury, J. A survey of students` ethical attitudes using computer-related scenarios. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Hanchey, C.M., & Kingsbury, J. A survey of students` ethical attitudes using computer-related scenarios. United States.
Hanchey, C.M., and Kingsbury, J. Sat . "A survey of students` ethical attitudes using computer-related scenarios". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_111328,
title = {A survey of students` ethical attitudes using computer-related scenarios},
author = {Hanchey, C.M. and Kingsbury, J.},
abstractNote = {Many studies exist that examine ethical beliefs and attitudes of university students ascending medium or large institutions. There are also many studies which examine ethical attitudes and beliefs of computer science and computer information systems majors. None, however, examines ethical attitudes of university students (regardless of undergraduate major) at a small, Christian, liberal arts institution regarding computer-related situations. This paper will present data accumulated by an on-going study in which students are presented seven scenarios--all of which involve some aspect of computing technology. These students were randomly selected from a small, Christian, liberal-arts university.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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