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Title: Synthesis and characterization of solvothermal processed calcium tungstate nanomaterials from alkoxide precursors.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1113055
Report Number(s):
SAND2013-8144J
Journal ID: ISSN 0897--4756; 476451
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemistry of Materials; Related Information: Proposed for publication in Chemistry of Materials.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Boyle, Timothy J., Yang, Pin, Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel, Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A., Neville, Michael Luke, and Hoppe, Sarah. Synthesis and characterization of solvothermal processed calcium tungstate nanomaterials from alkoxide precursors.. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1021/cm402622b.
Boyle, Timothy J., Yang, Pin, Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel, Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A., Neville, Michael Luke, & Hoppe, Sarah. Synthesis and characterization of solvothermal processed calcium tungstate nanomaterials from alkoxide precursors.. United States. doi:10.1021/cm402622b.
Boyle, Timothy J., Yang, Pin, Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel, Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A., Neville, Michael Luke, and Hoppe, Sarah. Sun . "Synthesis and characterization of solvothermal processed calcium tungstate nanomaterials from alkoxide precursors.". United States. doi:10.1021/cm402622b.
@article{osti_1113055,
title = {Synthesis and characterization of solvothermal processed calcium tungstate nanomaterials from alkoxide precursors.},
author = {Boyle, Timothy J. and Yang, Pin and Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel and Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A. and Neville, Michael Luke and Hoppe, Sarah},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.1021/cm402622b},
journal = {Chemistry of Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
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