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Title: Diesel fuel detergent additive performance and assessment

Abstract

Diesel fuel detergent additives are increasingly linked with high quality automotive diesel fuels. Both in Europe and in the USA, field problems associated with fuel injector coking or fouling have been experienced. In Europe indirect injection (IDI) light duty engines used in passenger cars were affected, while in the USA, a direct injection (DI) engine in heavy duty truck applications experienced field problems. In both cases, a fuel additive detergent performance test has evolved using an engine linked with the original field problem, although engine design modifications employed by the manufacturers have ensured improved operation in service. Increasing awareness of the potential for injector nozzle coking to cause deterioration in engine performance is coupled with a need to meet ever more stringent exhaust emissions legislation. These two requirements indicate that the use of detergency additives will continue to be associated with high quality diesel fuels. The paper examines detergency performance evaluated in a range of IDI and DI engines and correlates performance in the two most widely recognised test engines, namely the Peugeot 1.9 litre IDI, and Cummins L10 DI engines. 17 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
111173
Report Number(s):
CONF-9410173-
Journal ID: SAESA2; TRN: 95:007370-002
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: SAE Special Publication; Journal Issue: 1056; Conference: Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) international fuels and lubricants meeting and exposition, Baltimore, MD (United States), 17-20 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; DIESEL FUELS; QUALITY CONTROL; DETERGENTS; PERFORMANCE; DEPOSITS; EXHAUST GASES; ADDITIVES; NOZZLES; FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS; NUMERICAL DATA

Citation Formats

Vincent, M.W., Papachristos, M.J., Williams, D., and Burton, J. Diesel fuel detergent additive performance and assessment. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.4271/942010.
Vincent, M.W., Papachristos, M.J., Williams, D., & Burton, J. Diesel fuel detergent additive performance and assessment. United States. doi:10.4271/942010.
Vincent, M.W., Papachristos, M.J., Williams, D., and Burton, J. 1994. "Diesel fuel detergent additive performance and assessment". United States. doi:10.4271/942010.
@article{osti_111173,
title = {Diesel fuel detergent additive performance and assessment},
author = {Vincent, M.W. and Papachristos, M.J. and Williams, D. and Burton, J.},
abstractNote = {Diesel fuel detergent additives are increasingly linked with high quality automotive diesel fuels. Both in Europe and in the USA, field problems associated with fuel injector coking or fouling have been experienced. In Europe indirect injection (IDI) light duty engines used in passenger cars were affected, while in the USA, a direct injection (DI) engine in heavy duty truck applications experienced field problems. In both cases, a fuel additive detergent performance test has evolved using an engine linked with the original field problem, although engine design modifications employed by the manufacturers have ensured improved operation in service. Increasing awareness of the potential for injector nozzle coking to cause deterioration in engine performance is coupled with a need to meet ever more stringent exhaust emissions legislation. These two requirements indicate that the use of detergency additives will continue to be associated with high quality diesel fuels. The paper examines detergency performance evaluated in a range of IDI and DI engines and correlates performance in the two most widely recognised test engines, namely the Peugeot 1.9 litre IDI, and Cummins L10 DI engines. 17 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.},
doi = {10.4271/942010},
journal = {SAE Special Publication},
number = 1056,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}
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