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Title: Structures of intermediate transport states of ZneA, a Zn(II)/proton antiporter

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. (ULdB)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
FOREIGNNIH
OSTI Identifier:
1107415
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA; Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: (46) ; 11, 2013
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Pak, John Edward, Ekendé, Elisabeth Ngonlong, Kifle, Efrem G., O’Connell III, Joseph Daniel, De Angelis, Fabien, Tessema, Meseret B., Derfoufi, Kheiro-Mouna, Robles-Colmenares, Yaneth, Robbins, Rebecca A., Goormaghtigh, Erik, Vandenbussche, Guy, Stroud, Robert M., and UCSF). Structures of intermediate transport states of ZneA, a Zn(II)/proton antiporter. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1318705110.
Pak, John Edward, Ekendé, Elisabeth Ngonlong, Kifle, Efrem G., O’Connell III, Joseph Daniel, De Angelis, Fabien, Tessema, Meseret B., Derfoufi, Kheiro-Mouna, Robles-Colmenares, Yaneth, Robbins, Rebecca A., Goormaghtigh, Erik, Vandenbussche, Guy, Stroud, Robert M., & UCSF). Structures of intermediate transport states of ZneA, a Zn(II)/proton antiporter. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1318705110.
Pak, John Edward, Ekendé, Elisabeth Ngonlong, Kifle, Efrem G., O’Connell III, Joseph Daniel, De Angelis, Fabien, Tessema, Meseret B., Derfoufi, Kheiro-Mouna, Robles-Colmenares, Yaneth, Robbins, Rebecca A., Goormaghtigh, Erik, Vandenbussche, Guy, Stroud, Robert M., and UCSF). Mon . "Structures of intermediate transport states of ZneA, a Zn(II)/proton antiporter". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1318705110.
@article{osti_1107415,
title = {Structures of intermediate transport states of ZneA, a Zn(II)/proton antiporter},
author = {Pak, John Edward and Ekendé, Elisabeth Ngonlong and Kifle, Efrem G. and O’Connell III, Joseph Daniel and De Angelis, Fabien and Tessema, Meseret B. and Derfoufi, Kheiro-Mouna and Robles-Colmenares, Yaneth and Robbins, Rebecca A. and Goormaghtigh, Erik and Vandenbussche, Guy and Stroud, Robert M. and UCSF)},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1318705110},
journal = {Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA},
number = (46) ; 11, 2013,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Nov 25 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Mon Nov 25 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}
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