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Title: Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station

Abstract

Our objective in the characterization of sediments from Seaplane Lagoon at the Alameda Naval Air Station (NAS) was to determine the geochemical interactions that control the partitioning of cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc between the sediments and the porewaters. Our approach was to collect several cores at the east outfall location of the Seaplane Lagoon. We determined the porewater chemistry by (1) making in situ micro-electrode measurements, (2) extracting porewaters, and (3) modeling geochemical reactions. We determined the sediment chemistry by measuring (1) elemental abundance, (2) mineralogy, and (3) trace-element speciation. This information should help the US Navy determine the long-term hazard of the sediments if they are left in place and the short-term hazard if they are dredged. We did not fully examine the geochemistry of sediments from the West Beach Landfill Wetlands site, because these sediments were distinct from the Seaplane Lagoon sediments. Our initial motivation for studying the Landfill Wetlands site was to determine the trace-element geochemistry in Seaplane Lagoon sediments that had been dredged and then disposed in the Landfill Wetlands. Unfortunately, the location of these dredged sediments is unknown. The cores we sampled were not from the Seaplane Lagoon.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
11016
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-135193; EW04090100
EW04090100; TRN: AH200127%%606
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 16 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CADMIUM; CHEMISTRY; CHROMIUM; COBALT; COPPER; GEOCHEMISTRY; MERCURY; MINERALOGY; NICKEL; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SEDIMENTS; WETLANDS; ZINC

Citation Formats

Bono, A, Carroll, S, Esser, B, Luther, G W, O'Day, P, and Randall, S. Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/11016.
Bono, A, Carroll, S, Esser, B, Luther, G W, O'Day, P, & Randall, S. Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station. United States. doi:10.2172/11016.
Bono, A, Carroll, S, Esser, B, Luther, G W, O'Day, P, and Randall, S. Mon . "Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station". United States. doi:10.2172/11016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/11016.
@article{osti_11016,
title = {Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station},
author = {Bono, A and Carroll, S and Esser, B and Luther, G W and O'Day, P and Randall, S},
abstractNote = {Our objective in the characterization of sediments from Seaplane Lagoon at the Alameda Naval Air Station (NAS) was to determine the geochemical interactions that control the partitioning of cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc between the sediments and the porewaters. Our approach was to collect several cores at the east outfall location of the Seaplane Lagoon. We determined the porewater chemistry by (1) making in situ micro-electrode measurements, (2) extracting porewaters, and (3) modeling geochemical reactions. We determined the sediment chemistry by measuring (1) elemental abundance, (2) mineralogy, and (3) trace-element speciation. This information should help the US Navy determine the long-term hazard of the sediments if they are left in place and the short-term hazard if they are dredged. We did not fully examine the geochemistry of sediments from the West Beach Landfill Wetlands site, because these sediments were distinct from the Seaplane Lagoon sediments. Our initial motivation for studying the Landfill Wetlands site was to determine the trace-element geochemistry in Seaplane Lagoon sediments that had been dredged and then disposed in the Landfill Wetlands. Unfortunately, the location of these dredged sediments is unknown. The cores we sampled were not from the Seaplane Lagoon.},
doi = {10.2172/11016},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

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