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Title: A Sinter-Resistant Catalytic System Based on Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on TiO2 Nanofibers and Covered by Porous Silica

Abstract

Platinum is a key catalyst that is invaluable in many important industrial processes such as CO oxidation in catalytic converters, oxidation and reduction reactions in fuel cells, nitric acid production, and petroleum cracking.[1] Many of these applications utilize Pt nanoparticles supported on oxides or porous carbon.[2] However, in practical applications that involve high temperatures (typically higher than 3008C), the Pt nanoparticles tend to lose their specific surface area and thus catalytic activity during operation because of sintering. Recent studies have shown that a porous oxide shell can act as a physical barrier to prevent sintering of unsupported metal nanoparticles and, at the same time, provide channels for chemical species to reach the surface of the nanoparticles, thus allowing the catalytic reaction to occur. This concept has been demonstrated in several systems, including Pt@SiO2,[3] Pt@CoO,[4] Pt/CeO2@SiO2,[5] Pd@SiO2,[6] Au@SiO2,[7] Au@SnO2 [8] and Au@ZrO2 [9] core– shell nanostructures. Despite these results, a sinter-resistant system has not been realized in supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1097990
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 49(44):8165 –8168
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 49(44):8165 –8168
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Dai, Yunqian, Lim, Byungkwon, Yang, Yong, Cobley, Claire M., Li, Weiyang, Cho, Eun Chul, Grayson, Benjamin, Fanson, Paul T., Campbell, Charles T., Sun, Yueming, and Xia, Younan. A Sinter-Resistant Catalytic System Based on Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on TiO2 Nanofibers and Covered by Porous Silica. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1002/anie.201001839.
Dai, Yunqian, Lim, Byungkwon, Yang, Yong, Cobley, Claire M., Li, Weiyang, Cho, Eun Chul, Grayson, Benjamin, Fanson, Paul T., Campbell, Charles T., Sun, Yueming, & Xia, Younan. A Sinter-Resistant Catalytic System Based on Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on TiO2 Nanofibers and Covered by Porous Silica. United States. doi:10.1002/anie.201001839.
Dai, Yunqian, Lim, Byungkwon, Yang, Yong, Cobley, Claire M., Li, Weiyang, Cho, Eun Chul, Grayson, Benjamin, Fanson, Paul T., Campbell, Charles T., Sun, Yueming, and Xia, Younan. Mon . "A Sinter-Resistant Catalytic System Based on Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on TiO2 Nanofibers and Covered by Porous Silica". United States. doi:10.1002/anie.201001839.
@article{osti_1097990,
title = {A Sinter-Resistant Catalytic System Based on Platinum Nanoparticles Supported on TiO2 Nanofibers and Covered by Porous Silica},
author = {Dai, Yunqian and Lim, Byungkwon and Yang, Yong and Cobley, Claire M. and Li, Weiyang and Cho, Eun Chul and Grayson, Benjamin and Fanson, Paul T. and Campbell, Charles T. and Sun, Yueming and Xia, Younan},
abstractNote = {Platinum is a key catalyst that is invaluable in many important industrial processes such as CO oxidation in catalytic converters, oxidation and reduction reactions in fuel cells, nitric acid production, and petroleum cracking.[1] Many of these applications utilize Pt nanoparticles supported on oxides or porous carbon.[2] However, in practical applications that involve high temperatures (typically higher than 3008C), the Pt nanoparticles tend to lose their specific surface area and thus catalytic activity during operation because of sintering. Recent studies have shown that a porous oxide shell can act as a physical barrier to prevent sintering of unsupported metal nanoparticles and, at the same time, provide channels for chemical species to reach the surface of the nanoparticles, thus allowing the catalytic reaction to occur. This concept has been demonstrated in several systems, including Pt@SiO2,[3] Pt@CoO,[4] Pt/CeO2@SiO2,[5] Pd@SiO2,[6] Au@SiO2,[7] Au@SnO2 [8] and Au@ZrO2 [9] core– shell nanostructures. Despite these results, a sinter-resistant system has not been realized in supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts.},
doi = {10.1002/anie.201001839},
journal = {Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 49(44):8165 –8168},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {10}
}