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Title: Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the research, development, and demonstration activities that ensure nuclear energy remains a viable energy option for the United States. Fuel and material development through fabrication, irradiation, and characterization play a significant role in accomplishing the research needed to support nuclear energy. All fuel and material development requires the understanding of irradiation effects on the fuel performance and relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted scientific questions to integral effects under representative and prototypic conditions. The DOE recently emphasized a solution-driven, goal-oriented, science-based approach to nuclear energy development. Nuclear power systems and materials were initially developed during the latter half of the 20th century and greatly facilitated by the United States’ ability and willingness to conduct large-scale experiments. Fifty-two research and test reactors with associated facilities for performing fabrication and pre and post irradiation examinations were constructed at what is now Idaho National Laboratory (INL), another 14 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and a few more at other national laboratory sites. Building on the scientific advances of the last several decades, our understanding of fundamental nuclear science, improvements in computational platforms, and other tools nowmore » enable technological advancements with less reliance on large-scale experimentation.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
1097152
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-11-22624
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATR-NSUF; CAES; Post Irradiation Capabilities; Post Irradiation Examination

Citation Formats

Schulthess, J.L., Robert D. Mariani, Rory Kennedy, and Doug Toomer. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1097152.
Schulthess, J.L., Robert D. Mariani, Rory Kennedy, & Doug Toomer. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. United States. doi:10.2172/1097152.
Schulthess, J.L., Robert D. Mariani, Rory Kennedy, and Doug Toomer. Mon . "Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory". United States. doi:10.2172/1097152. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1097152.
@article{osti_1097152,
title = {Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory},
author = {Schulthess, J.L. and Robert D. Mariani and Rory Kennedy and Doug Toomer},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the research, development, and demonstration activities that ensure nuclear energy remains a viable energy option for the United States. Fuel and material development through fabrication, irradiation, and characterization play a significant role in accomplishing the research needed to support nuclear energy. All fuel and material development requires the understanding of irradiation effects on the fuel performance and relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted scientific questions to integral effects under representative and prototypic conditions. The DOE recently emphasized a solution-driven, goal-oriented, science-based approach to nuclear energy development. Nuclear power systems and materials were initially developed during the latter half of the 20th century and greatly facilitated by the United States’ ability and willingness to conduct large-scale experiments. Fifty-two research and test reactors with associated facilities for performing fabrication and pre and post irradiation examinations were constructed at what is now Idaho National Laboratory (INL), another 14 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and a few more at other national laboratory sites. Building on the scientific advances of the last several decades, our understanding of fundamental nuclear science, improvements in computational platforms, and other tools now enable technological advancements with less reliance on large-scale experimentation.},
doi = {10.2172/1097152},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {8}
}

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